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artic cat 800

This is a discussion on artic cat 800 within the Arctic Cat forums, part of the Brand Specific Snowmobile Discussion category; i was wondering was the zrt 800 a good sled how long do they last reliable sleds or breakdown alot any comments please what kind ...

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Thread: artic cat 800

  1. #1
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    i was wondering was the zrt 800 a good sled how long do they last reliable sleds or breakdown alot any comments please what kind of top speed horsepower ratings can you do a few mods or not thanks alot just wanting some opinions if this was a good sled or not

  2. #2
    450 horse ditch bannger
    is though he blew up his cat lol
     
    440_jag's Avatar
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    Yeah the are a power house sled. They have been know to break chains if you have studs..... so i have been told. 142 horse power.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 440_jag
    Yeah the are a power house sled. They have been know to break chains if you have studs..... so i have been told. 142 horse power.
    ok i appreciate that. i wont be studding the track but thanks for the info on that.

  4. #4
    450 horse ditch bannger
    is though he blew up his cat lol
     
    440_jag's Avatar
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    did you get it or whats the deal?

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    XCR HYPER TRIPLE's Avatar
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    Here is info on the 2001, 2000, 1999 and the 1995. The 2000 - 2001 ZRT's 145 HP, 1998 ZRT's 144.6HP, 1996 - 1997 ZRT's 150 HP and the 1995 ZRT's 151.1 HP.

    2000 ZRT 800

    145 HP @ 8000 RPM

    Box Stock 60' ET 330' ET 660' MPH 660' ET 1000' MPH 1000' ET 1320' MPH 1320' ET 0-30 MPH 0-60 MPH 0-100 MPH
    ZRT 800 1.761 4.871 90.00 7.570 96.36 10.056 100.66 12.274 1.31 3.36 11.71

    2001 ZRT

    Arctic Cat ZRT 800
    Grins: Solid throttle and clutch response.

    Groans: Needs more refining.

    Arctic Cat left its 800 triple pretty much alone for the 2001 season. It still carries the same power plant, same suspension and body work as last year. The only major change from 2000 to 2001 is its new gas tank.

    Cat's Suzuki 794cc triple engine has been a solid performer for years. It has won more races than can be counted. The case reed mill definitely has a history of dependable high performance. Two years ago we saw flat slide carbs make the trail riding experience better with light flipper pulls for the thumb.

    Throttle position sensors keep the engine at optimal performance for the trail and lake racing alike. A counterbalancer on the shaft delivers smooth engine performance, no matter what the rpm. "I think that's one thing nice about having triples is they're smooth and they're quiet as the power goes along," said Test Rider Les Pinz. "They don't get much vibration coming out of them."

    The AWS V double A-arm front suspension is outfitted with Arctic Cat Technology (ACT) internal floating piston shocks. The setup is similar to Fox's shocks, but manufactured within Cat's specifications for damping performance and overall durability. The shock body and shaft are coated with melanite for corrosion resistance and reduced friction. Overall the double A-arm setup offers 9.2 inches of vertical travel for the nose end.

    The FasTrack rear suspension also utilizes the ACT IFP racing shock for motion damping. Cat's rear skid allows for 13.5 inches of vertical travel over the bumps and junk of rough trails. Cat rolled out its Torque Sensing Link (TSL) four years ago to keep the track tension consistent when traveling through its 13.5 inches of movement. Like all Cats, the ZRT is most at home when it's being worked through the rough trail. The faster you go, the better the suspensions work.

    One of the big areas our crew noted for improvement on the test unit we had was in the steering system. The handlebars were very loose feeling on the trail, both at high speed and low speed. "One thing I noticed on the ZRTs is the play in the handlebars," noted Test Rider Les. "For the miles they had on these prototype sleds, they already have too much freeplay in the bars. They'll have to address this for production."

    Cat worked on improving the rider's comfort experience on the ZRT 800, as well as its other performance machines. The new 12-gallon fuel tank is a big move forward, not only for Arctic Cat, but for the whole industry. The rear taper is significantly more comfortable than last season's 13-gallon tank. The super sized fuel filler hole is ample enough to allow consumers to insert the gas pump and see the gas level as it creeps up. We liked Cat's new ATV-style mechanical fuel gauge. It still gives the fill level without having the engine running, but it doesn't have a removable float system which drizzles gas on the seat when you remove it.

    Overall, the ZRT 800 rated OK with our test crew. Many noted it felt heavy on the trail in comparison to the Polaris. It has a few new features which cover some of our concerns from last season, but it still has some refinement to go to be on a par with the XCR in our test crew's eyes.

    Final Words
    So that's the triple triple big iron class of 2001. There aren't a lot of big changes to these sleds, but the manufacturers haven't left the big iron class alone, either. Our test crew witnessed an outlaw competitive run of these three machines on a lake in West Yellowstone last spring. What we saw was the XCR consistently pulling out early and holding its lead, with the Mach Z and ZRT 800 keeping close watch. After about a half mile of throttle massage, there was only about a four-sled length difference from first to third. What does that tell us? It says anyone could beat the next one, so keep your sled in good repair and make sure you're dialed in for the conditions.

    AMSNOW "QUICK QUOTES"

    Polaris: "Clutch response and throttle response on the 800 XCR were both outstanding. The overall feel of that snowmobile does not seem like a triple triple."

    - Test Rider Doug Erickson

    Arctic Cat: "I think that's one thing nice about having triples like the ZRT is they're smooth and they're quiet as the power goes along. They don't get much vibration out of them."

    - Test Rider Les Pinz

    Ski-Doo: "The tilt steering and the adjustable windshield were an added bonus on the Mach Z Tech Plus. It was a great move by Ski-Doo to offer this option to a performance-oriented rider. It gives them a comfortable position for all styles of riding."

    - Test Rider Jeff Velander


    2000 ZRT

    Arctic Cat ZRT 800
    Grins: Great suspension for hard riding.

    Groans: The fuel tank causes pain while riding hard.

    The ZRT 800 did not change substantially from last season to this season.The 1999 muscle Cat took on a hot new look and added the lightweight AWSV front suspension system. All that returns, plus the ZRT will feature Arctic Cat's new melonite-coated internal floating piston shock absorbers.

    We liked the '99 ZRT we rode so much last spring, we picked it as best of the class. What we didn't realize was that the redesigned airbox would give the sled some problems. The reduced noise levels were certainly a boon to the machine, but it came at a price. The airbox reduced the airflow to the carbs and resulted in a poorly performing bone stock sled. This was especially apparent at our Shoot-Out. In box stock form, the ZRT could only muster 81 miles per hour at the quarter mile. With a little massaging (airboxdrilling) from the dealer, the ZRT woke up to its 99 mph self. We expect the same will need to happen this season, as Cat officials have indicated the airbox will be the same this year.

    The 794cc Suzuki triple returns in the same form as it has for the past several seasons. It is a strong motor, when properly fed. Our crew noted that the trio of Mikuni TM38 carburetors found on the ZRT were quite easy on the thumb. "Throttle pull with the flat slide carbs and the rack system was very light," noted Test Rider Doug.

    Cat's brake also received high praise. "The Wilwood brakes are still,I believe, the benchmark in brakes," added Doug. "However, the lever on the Arctic Cat is very good, but doesn't quite match the lever Yamaha uses."

    The AWS V and FasTrack front and rear suspensions are exactly what we've come to expect from Arctic Cat- smooth and predictable at speed and a little on the stiff side when putting down the trail. Cat's new IFP shocks performed every bit as well as the Fox units did on previous models. In addition to the corrosion and friction fighting melonite coating on the shocks, each unit has a four-ring oil seal and a unique wiper to keep oil in and contaminants out of the body tube. The true test will be next season when we put the new shocks through a 1000 mile long term test cycle.

    Arctic's double wishbone front suspension is capable of holding a tight corner very well. Its lightweight aluminum construction makes it feel light and easy to handle on a long day in the woods. With the ZRT's new 43-inch ski stance, the front suspension offers 8.75 inches of vertical travel.

    The FasTrack rear suspension is housed within Cat's Extended Travel Tunnel.The broken back tunnel design has been around for a few years and allows the suspension to reach 13.5 inches of travel while keeping the rider position relatively low. The Torque-Sensing Link cantilevered rear arm keeps the.85-inch lug track at a constant tension throughout suspension compression.It all works well for aggressively mashing through the rough trail sections.

    Unfortunately, like the rest of Cat's performance sleds, the ZRT has that extended 13-gallon fuel tank. Even Doug, who is over six feet tall noted, "in order to increase range, Arctic Cat added a few gallons to the fuel tank and it made it very cumbersome to ride the snowmobile.When I ride aggressively, I tend to move up toward the center of the snowmobile,and with the fuel tank extended back to that area, it is very uncomfortable.It was certainly noticeable and my recommendation to Arctic Cat would be to either redesign the fuel tank or see if they can increase the fuel economy rather than fuel capacity.

    Overall, the ZRT is a good machine, but needs a few refinements. Most significantly, the fuel tank issue needs to be addressed. Secondarily, the air flow issue needs some resolution. Last year we picked the big Cat as our favorite, but despite all it has going for it, a few critical shortcomings dropped the 2000 ZRT 800 to the back of the pack in our test crew's eyes.

    2000 Arctic Cat ZRT 800
    Overall Height: 48 inches
    Overall Length: 112 inches
    Weight: 561 lbs.
    Ski Stance: 43 inches
    Engine: 794cc liquid-cooled, case reed Suzuki triple
    Exhaust: 3 Tuned pipes
    Clutch:
    Drive: Arctic rpm sensing
    Driven: Arctic roller cam
    Suspension Travel:
    Front: AWS V double wishbone A-arms, ACT shocks, 8.75 in.
    Rear: FasTrack, ETT, adjustable torsion springs,TSL, ACT shocks, 13.5 in.
    Fuel Capacity: 13 gallons
    Key Features: Wilwood hydraulic brake, 3-bulb headlamp, plastic skis, mid-height windsheild,speedo, tach, low oil light.
    Retail Price: $8,599

    The Final Word
    We still enjoy riding the big iron. While they aren't as much fun on a rough, mogully trail as the lightweight twins, these sleds have finally come into their own as smooth trail machines. There's still plenty of horsepower to be had in this class. When we lined them all up on the lake, the XCR was claimed first. The Mach Z was the second sled our drivers went for,and the last one picked was the ZRT. Coincidentally, that was also the sleds' finishing order, no matter what size rider each had onboard. Just because the majority of manufacturers have seemingly left these big bore muscular snow rockets to themselves doesn't mean you should. They're a blast!


    1995 ZRT 151.1HP @ 8000RPM
    1995 Arctic Cat ZRT 800
    By AmSnow staff
    Published: Friday, September 01, 1995
    How powerful is a particular snowmobile? The dyno knows. How much power
    did those extensive, expensive mods really add in power? The dyno knows.
    All good (and not-so-good) natured teasing aside, a sled can't hide its flaws from this end-all engine diagnostic. We put the Arctic Cat ZRT 800 through its paces at the AMERICAN SNOWMOBILER Battle of Old Forge Shoot-Out V. Jim Czekala, editor of DYNOTECH was on hand with his dynamic SuperFlow dynamometer to capture the pure power picture. The results are based on a fresh, just-out-of-the-box ZRT 800.

    We were especially interested in debunking some unfounded rumor that Arctic Cat was said to have made only 200 ZRT 800s with more than 145 horsepower.
    The rest, so the rumor goes, were in the 130 range. Regardless, after checking
    around to performance shops and running an independent dyno, we were confident that we had the genuine "average" article.

    Czekala found that our Cat was about three horsepower healthier than others he had previously dynoed. At 151.1 horsepower, this cc Cat roared in just 10.4 horsepower shy of a tested 1994 Thundercat (the ZR also ran better quarter-mile runs than the T-Cat at 11.928 and 11.811 seconds).

    Backed with this power, the ZR 800 held its own in the 800 class shoot-out, coming in second behind the Mach Z (ahead of the Vmax-4 and Storm), with
    two stock runs at over 105 mph. The ZR led the 800cc class with a best run
    (330 feet) of 4.627 seconds and a miles per hour gain (from the eighth to the quarter) of 19.96.

    The dyno sheet shows you that the 800cc Cat delivers maximum power at 8500 rpm and holds it past peak.


    1995 ARCTIC CAT 800 ZRT
    Weight: 614 lbs.
    Data for 29.92 inches Hg, 60 F dry air
    Test: 100 RPM/Sec Acceleration
    Fuel Specific Gravity: .745
    Vapor Pressure: .30 Barometer: 30.01
    RPM CBT CBHP FUEL BSFC CAT
    7000 81.5 108.6 86.8 .80 50
    7250 87.2 120.4 90.9 .75 49
    7500 90.1 128.7 93.5 .72 50
    7400 90.8 127.9 .638 79.1 89.5
    7500 90.9 129.7 .617 77.7 89.5
    7750 97.9 144.5 96.1 .66 51
    8000 99.2 151.1 96.4 .64 51
    8250 94.2 148.0 99.0 .67 51
    8750 52.0 86.6 104.4 1.20 50



    RPM: Engine crankshaft speed. CBT: Corrected Brake Torque.
    CBHP: Corrected Brake Horsepower. FUEL: Actual fuel flow
    pounds per hour.
    BSFC: Brake Specific Fuel Consumption. CAT: Carb Air
    Temperature.


    Cheers

    Quote Originally Posted by 440_jag
    Yeah the are a power house sled. They have been know to break chains if you have studs..... so i have been told. 142 horse power.
    That was the 800 ZR twin with 141.1 HP

    Cheers


  6. #6
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    thanks for the info. yes on the person that asked if i had it. i do have it and the motor i have already removed it from the sled but still have all the parts for it.

    Quote Originally Posted by 440_jag
    did you get it or whats the deal?
    yes i do have it. the motor is out of it also but have all the parts.

  7. #7
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    TNT123's Avatar
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    my friend has a 96 zrt 800 and he is having the hole sled gone through. last year he took it to a shop to find out why it wasn't getting spark. he was told it was the staterplate. he decided to have the a-arms removed to get them powdercoated and thats when all the problems started. he found out his bulkhead was rotting out. so he had to buy a new bulkhead for $780. he then decided to do some upgrades like a new clutch w/clutch kit, a new track, rebuild all four shocks,stingers,4in riser,new c&a pro skis,rebuilt staterplate,bored out carbs,all new bearings for everything,96 woodys studs with green circle backers,new seat cover,new fuel lines,racing kit for the fuel pump,new speedometer,new radieator hoses,new roller secondary cover,new boots for the carbs,new handlebars,and handlebar hooks,rebuilt entire skidframe,and hes still modifying it. he cant wait to get it back and neather can I. all said and done before the stater went bad he loved the sled cause it hauled ass.the zrt 800s are considerd muscle sleds so take good care of yours.it may be worth a lot of money in the future.

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