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ctthomas015 said:
does anyone know the stock hp of a 02 polaris edge x 700
I believe they are 134 hp, I may be wrong but pretty sure.
 

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I think the they are closer to 130 HP. The 02 800's were 138 HP. There should be more than a 4 HP difference I would think.
 

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The 2001 1/2 and up ves 700 have 127.4 HP and 87.2 pounds of torque. The ves 800 had 140.2 HP at 7700 rpm and 95.6 pounds of torque when jetted right.

Cheers


Thinksno said:
134 Hp for the 02 700. 127 hp for 03 and up if they are lucky

2001 1/2 Polaris 700 VES
Sometimes your consumers will help you out
By AmSnow staff
Published: February 28, 2001
Last winter, when we trekked up to Roseau for the 2001 model introduction, Polaris officials were adamant about not putting variable exhaust valves on big twins. "They don't have a significant effect on engine performance for the cost," they told us. "Hmmm," we thought quietly. "Someone should have told Ski-Doo, since Rotax had been churning out wide-mouthed, potent 670 and 700 RAVE twins since '93."

In late November, we broke the news on our website that consumers would find a limited quantity of 700 XC SPs roaming the trails with a set of variable exhaust valves installed on the cylinder. The market demand was strong enough to convince Polaris product planners to go ahead with the VES engine. "We are listening to our consumers who are requesting Variable Exhaust," explained Polaris' Snowmobile Product Manager Bow Crosby. We're glad they are.

In addition to the exhaust valves, the cylinders on Polaris' domestic big block 700 have been internally modified. "The major change was the addition of the exhaust valves and some port timing," Crosby explained. "We also added TPS, fuel selector switch and WTS (water temp. sensor)."

The whole package combined to show us 127.4 horsepower and 87.2 pounds of torque on the dyno. That's about a nine hp gain over the non-valved version.

"This is an excellent motor," said our dyno guy, Rich Daly from Dynoport. "We found the same power with a two-jet spread, so guys aren't going to have to be tuning all day to keep up performance."

In addition to the output gains on the engine, Crosby repeated what Cat's engineers told us about their variable exhaust engines: "overall performance will be improved as will running quality. In addition, consumers can expect to see an approximate 20% increase in fuel economy when the sled is operated at trail speeds (30-45 mph), obviously this is dependent on driving habits, snow conditions, etc. Also, the sled runs quieter because of the valves."

Polaris listened to its consumers when they demanded a valved big bore twin. The lineup is all the better for it.
 

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Thinksno said:
134 Hp for the 02 700. 127 hp for 03 and up if they are lucky
I second this. 02 700's were by far the best 700 since 1998 ever from Polaris.
 

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The actual 02 700 sled was a performer and unlike sleds of late did work better than what Polaris advertised. Big differences from an 03 and up at 127 hp. If the 800 is jetted to make more power it wont last, the 700 would run hard all day and not have an issue.

Ref HP info from DT:
2001, 1997 & 1998 700 XC 124 HP non power valve engine
2002 800 XC 137.5 HP @ 7800 RPM
2002 700 XC 133.1 HP @7800 RPM
2002 600 XC 116.4 HP @ 7700 RPM
2003 800 ProX 121.7 HP @ 7300, stock jetting
2003 700 ProX 120.60HP @ 7800 RPM , stock jetting .72 BSFC
2004 600 ProX 108.9 HP @ 7800, . 76 BSFC
2004 700 ProX 120.7 HP @ 700 RPM, .73 BSFC
2004 800 ProX 115 HP @7300 RPM Appeared to have dyno induced reactions to the new deto sensor or water temp sensor retarded timing. With a 2003 XC CDI box & wire harness -- 122.7 HP @ 7800, .76 BSFC.
 

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Thinksno said:
The actual 02 700 sled was a performer and unlike sleds of late did work better than what Polaris advertised. Big differences from an 03 and up at 127 hp. If the 800 is jetted to make more power it wont last, the 700 would run hard all day and not have an issue.

Ref HP info from DT:
2001, 1997 & 1998 700 XC 124 HP non power valve engine
2002 800 XC 137.5 HP @ 7800 RPM
2002 700 XC 133.1 HP @7800 RPM
2002 600 XC 116.4 HP @ 7700 RPM
2003 800 ProX 121.7 HP @ 7300, stock jetting
2003 700 ProX 120.60HP @ 7800 RPM , stock jetting .72 BSFC
2004 600 ProX 108.9 HP @ 7800, . 76 BSFC
2004 700 ProX 120.7 HP @ 700 RPM, .73 BSFC
2004 800 ProX 115 HP @7300 RPM Appeared to have dyno induced reactions to the new deto sensor or water temp sensor retarded timing. With a 2003 XC CDI box & wire harness -- 122.7 HP @ 7800, .76 BSFC.
Found it thanks! Amazing how the 2001 1/2 was 127.4 and the 2002 was 133.1, I have a feeling the leaned it out just like the 800.

Cheers



700 Single Pipe Official Results
By AmSnow staff
Published: December 10, 2001

This was impressive. Or, more aptly should we say that the Polaris 700 XC SP was impressive. It dynoed just over 4 hp less than the 800cc Polaris twin. (Is it any wonder the mountain guys are screaming for the 700 long trackers?) And it ran extremely well, too!

Last year the 700 without exhaust valving was limited to about 122 hp. That's good, but it isn't as good as this year's 133.1 @ 7800 revs. And the new sled's times in the quarter were better despite the fact it had to plow through sand versus snow. No, the 2002 Polaris had a worst quarter mile ET in the 12.6s, which was among the best. The new best for the 700 XC was 12.233 seconds.

The Ski-Doo's best reflected the sand trap. Last year a similarly powerful MXZ 700 managed a 12.571-quarter. It's best this time was a hair under 13 seconds.

Yamaha's Viper was off the mark entirely as the sand and friction really slowed it down. In the previous day's testing of a similar model, Big Moose Yamaha's test crew got the stock setup through the quarter in12.83 seconds for a top speed of 91.9 miles per hour. On our fairway replete with sand trap, the triple cylinder, single-piped Yamaha was fighting hard to get under 13.5 for the quarter and 84.4 mph. It was painfully obvious that the Yamaha suffered the most from track conditions which gave it zilch for slide lubrication. We expect on-snow performance will be much better, but it would have to be miraculous to best the Polaris 700 twin.
 
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