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I was at the gas station yesterday and noticed they had 110 Octane. I think it was leaded, but I could be wrong. Could this stuff be used in a snowmobile without blowing it up? If so is it worth it?
 

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Don't bother with it
 

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Can be used if your built for it, other than that it is a waste.
 

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it's only good if you have done something to raise compression. it wouldn't hurt if you used it, but it wouldn't really do any good and it wouldn't be worth it.
 

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110 race gas if for high compression motors like was stated already. yes, it does have lead in it.
it will do nothing for you running it in a stock motor other than drain your wallet at $5/gallon.
 

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you will actually loose power running race fuel in an engine not built for it.
 

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Originally posted by indy440
[br]you will actually loose power running race fuel in an engine not built for it.
hes right something to do with the fact that higher octane has a higher detonation point so its harder to burn the fuel..... i know what im talking about just not good with words.....or so i tell myself
 

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Originally posted by sschwei399
[br]
Originally posted by indy440
[br]you will actually loose power running race fuel in an engine not built for it.
hes right something to do with the fact that higher octane has a higher detonation point so its harder to burn the fuel..... i know what im talking about just not good with words.....or so i tell myself
The reason that it will hurt performance is because the higher octane will burn slower and cooler than the fuel that your sled calls for.
If you were to mill the heads, port it, and advance your timing, then you would need it, but until you mod your machine, don't bother as it will make you run way too rich and waiste lots of extra $$ in the process.
 

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Originally posted by indy440
[br]you will actually loose power running race fuel in an engine not built for it.
^This is 100% untrue^.
The only engine that knows how much octane the fuel has is the one that does not have enough.
snoeproe said it like it is, all it will do for your stock engine sled is drain your wallet.
 

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^^^^
That is incorrect and correct.
The correct part is that it will drain the wallet.
The incorrect part is about the performance loss.
Too little octane and it pings and detonates, too much octane and it does burn too rich as not all of the fuel air mix is being burnt.
 

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Originally posted by Student Driver
[br]^^^^
That is incorrect and correct.
The correct part is that it will drain the wallet.
The incorrect part is about the performance loss.
Too little octane and it pings and detonates, too much octane and it does burn too rich as not all of the fuel air mix is being burnt.
Absolutly wrong! Too much octane is a myth, your engine cannot and will not ever know it has 'too much' octane. As I said the only engine that will know what the octane of the fuel is is the engine that does not have enough.
 

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I have to disagree on this one.
The definition of octane is basically detonation point.
I know that higher octane burns slower and cooler, and thus richer.
Burning too lean is too hot and too rich is too cool.
Too rich is going to run all barbely and load up etc.
I've seen it my self when working at sled shops and I've read this in tech manuals.

Now it is true that it has to be farther off on the high side to notice the difference in performance where as too low of octane does show up rather quickly in the form of detonation and pinging, but it is true none the less. Running 110 when his machine calls for 87 to 91 is a large jump and will be noticed in the loss of some RPMs.
It's impossible to have a possibility of too low of octane with out the possibility of too high of octane.
 

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Well, I suggest you get some 110 and try it yourself then. I know what I am talking about and I stand with what I say.
 

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Is this dyno verified? Seat-of-the-pants dyno is not accurate. I would be willing to believe that over-octaning would not reduce power much if at all, but will never gain power.
 

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^^^ Actually, yes, it was dyno tested on one of my race bikes a few years ago. Stock bike, 114 octane 113 HP. same bike, same day 87 octane 113 HP... many, many, mods later, 87 octane 153 HP same day 93 octane 154 HP, same day 114 octane 163 HP... I still have the dyno sheets if you really need me to scan them in and show you.
 

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Originally posted by tripplethret
[br]Well, I suggest you get some 110 and try it yourself then.
Too late.

After we built the mod sled, it needed some better fuel because of porting, milled heads, etc.
Had to run a mix of 1 gallon 114 octane Pro-Purple VP with 4 gallons Chevron 91 making each 5 gallon mix.
Didn't ping or detonate that way.

For one of it's last rides, I had about 10 gallons of 114 left and ran it straight. Seemed OK on bottom end through lower mid range, but was missing about 750 RPMs on top and just didn't run as clean as usual from mid through top.
Instead of the normal brown, the plugs were showing black.
Clearly way too rich

The next day in the same exact riding area, the exact same jetting and set up, and with it being a little warmer temp outside which normally makes you burn even richer to begin with, but with the fuel dumped out, mixed to the normal ratio, and zero other changes, I had my RPMs back and the plugs showed a nice brown again.

Of course this is not an official dyno, but factual none the less and a good indicator as well.

I've also seen it in other peoples sleds when they bring them into the shop when I worked there.
The one in particular used to just guess on his ratios by mixing it in the tank and he notoriously would go way too much with the race fuel. At about his 3rd or so ride, he would not be running good and bring it in to see why.
We would have to go through it, drain the fuel and give him a good mix, feild test on the hill at elevation with him to set up.
It would run great for about 3 or so rides until he had basically straight high octane again and we would have to do it all again.
This continued until he started measuring his mix in fuel cans and then he never had the problem again.

So I do stand by what I said as I have seen it on more than a few occassions with my own 2 eyes.
 

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Porting gives no reason for better fuel, the only reason your mod sled needed beter fuel is the fact that you have higher compression by milling the heads.
As far as running in elevation I admit to having no personal experience with but I will say unless I actually experienced what you are saying I dont believe a word of it and I stand by what I have been saying all along, the only engine that knows what octane is in the fuel is the one that does not have enough. You have your opinion and I have mine and I guess untill we ride together and you can prove your point to me I will rely on what I know from my personal experience too.
All good here and no hard feelings.[:)]
 

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with 110 octane in a stock sled, I'll put money down that the sled will be a pig to start.

lower compression = cooler running engine makes a high octane hard to ignite
 
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