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hey again, more questions, my 1999 polaris has fox shocks, how do i know if they need rebuilt, or charged, or whatever you do to shocks? also my wifes 1990 phazer, how do I check the suspension? is there a suspensin for dummies book ? sorry so many questions lately, just want to learn everything I can about the sport, machines, everything, just love it. thanks.
 

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shove down either end of the sled, if it comes back up super fast you need a rebuild. check all of the bolts on the skid and tighten all of them. no one ever checks the bolts, they get loose, and oval out the holes.
 

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Go to http://www.jbshocks.com/index.html. Jerry is on this site and is very helpful.
 

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If it springs up like a mattress spring, then it's time. I imagine that for optimal performance, for a slow/average rider, every 1500-2000 miles would suffice. Harder riding means you should do it more often.

So if your sled is over 2000 miles and never done, it might be time to get them in to a local shock guy.
 

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A good responses. The best is to remove them and rebuild all four of them. 1999 sled. Should be done every 1500-2000 miles IMO. There are a few members that rebuild shocks, myself included.
 

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Exactly what GTO said.

I have 13,000 miles on my shocks and they have never been rebuilt because my sled doesn't bounce around like a mattress spring. You will find if you do them 'every 1500-2000 miles you will have absolutely NO change in the way they work. If they leak, get them rebuilt...period. If they are springy, just get them re-charged and your good to go.
 

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Just a recharge and no new oil? I would venture to guess that after that many miles, the oil in your shocks looks like mud. I would also guess that you do not have all the pressure in them as it should. Many of the shocks that I've done, that have never been done, have about 100 psi in them at the IFP. Supposed to be around 200. They appeared to work just fine with no leaks but once they are taken apart, the oil looks like a cappucino and low on pressure.

To me, that would be like changing the oil filter in your car, but not changing the oil.

I'm not an expert at this shock rebuilding but just do it on the side for friends and family. Hopefully, JB will chime in with his opinion.

A quote: "It's better to have new cheap oil than old expensive oil". Just read that today from a shock builder.
 
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