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Hello All,

I recently got a 2013 Polaris switchback. This is my first modern snowmobile as I used to ride old Polaris wedge chassis style. I had it in the shop, rebuilt all the stock Fox shocks and went through the entire sled. I set up the shocks to the "Perfect fit" that's in the owners manual. I took it to northern Wisconsin to ride this past weekend and man new sleds are way different than the older ones. I'll start by saying the sled handles the minimal trail chop beautifully. I was barely sore after 175 mile ride. However, I ride fairly aggressively and I think the handling is pretty awful. I can't keep the lead ski on the ground when cornering. It's borderline dangerous.
Like I mentioned I come from older wedge chassis sleds so your center of gravity is way lower. Maybe this is how the newer sleds are but wanted to hear from other owners and their thoughts.
Also if anyone has any special shock set up's they run I'd love to hear the recommendations.
 

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I too upgraded to the Pro Ride chassis from my '99 XC so I know the difference you speak of. I ride a '12 600 Switch. While it's a great sled with an amazing rear suspension I think it handles kind of blah. I've tried a few different set ups as far as carbides and settings go. Next for me is a new set of skis to help but I believe we are looking at two different complaints here. I don't ride too aggressive as often times I have my daughter in front. I am dealing with a fair amount of push in the corners, like just can't get the skis to bite at times. I have played with the front track shock and am currently running very expensive Bergstrom triple point carbides and have a bunch of studs in the track. I have rebuilt Walker Evans shocks on my sled.

I know of the ski lift you speak of and it is certainly there if you ride hard. I think body english is huge on these sleds with the higher COG. Once you set the sled up for your weight I think a learning curve will get you where you want to be.

Is the track studded? What length carbides up front?

Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk
 

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I too upgraded to the Pro Ride chassis from my '99 XC so I know the difference you speak of. I ride a '12 600 Switch. While it's a great sled with an amazing rear suspension I think it handles kind of blah. I've tried a few different set ups as far as carbides and settings go. Next for me is a new set of skis to help but I believe we are looking at two different complaints here. I don't ride too aggressive as often times I have my daughter in front. I am dealing with a fair amount of push in the corners, like just can't get the skis to bite at times. I have played with the front track shock and am currently running very expensive Bergstrom triple point carbides and have a bunch of studs in the track. I have rebuilt Walker Evans shocks on my sled.

I know of the ski lift you speak of and it is certainly there if you ride hard. I think body english is huge on these sleds with the higher COG. Once you set the sled up for your weight I think a learning curve will get you where you want to be.

Is the track studded? What length carbides up front?

Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk
With just getting into this sled not to long ago I'll be honest I don't know what type of carbides are on it. I bought it, went through all the bearings and chain case to make sure everything was up to snuff. Cleaned the exhaust valves and put it all back together. So this past weekend was my first time out.
As far as your push factor. I also posted on hardcore sledder under the rush platform and got 3 responses already. I would post your issue there or look at mine and ask the question. There seems to be more feedback on that site for our platform.
 

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Understand your feeling. Have two 2011 Rush 800s. Couple options for you. My sled. I loosened the spring on the undercarriage shock all the way. Then have the front springs cranked way up. I have always used gripper skis too. Steering is stiff. It helped a fair amount. You have to learn how to corner exit easing into the throttle. I hated my sled at first too. The one thing you've got to admit is. When you get in trouble crossed up, huge bumps, ice, god forbid a tree. My sled will turn and get me out of trouble. Guaranteed! The other sled is set up different. We put an extra heavy spring on the back shock. Have the front springs set so loose we've lost two of the spring retainers. That works for my son. He's more of a glide rider. (He learned on a fusion) I myself am a stomp and steer guy. Happy riding.
 
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