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Discussion Starter #1
I know it is a total n00b question... But what is the correct way to remove/install the drive belt on a 1999 XC 700 SP? Please do not be afraid of being too descriptive, pictures would also be helpful... Also how much deflection should a properly adjusted belt have?
 

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freak007 said:
I know it is a total n00b question... But what is the correct way to remove/install the drive belt on a 1999 XC 700 SP? Please do not be afraid of being too descriptive, pictures would also be helpful... Also how much deflection should a properly adjusted belt have?
its actualy very simple, easiest way is with the track of the ground,place the rear end on a stand or some kinda support, put a hand on the belt near the secondary clutch (rear most clutch) and start to work the belt around and off the clutch while at the same time turning the clutch, hence having the track of the ground to make the turning of the clutch easier, it should slip off fairly easy, if that is tough then continue to do what i just explaind but get the belt so it will stay have way off the clutch bye its self and continue to turn the clutch but at the same time turn the primary with it (foward most clutch) wich will aid in truning the secondary. once you get it the first time it a breeze to go from their.

with a good COLD belt the deflection should be (with some sort of sraitedge across both clutches on top of belt) should be around 1/2 inch when pushed till tension comes out of belt.
 

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Right now your belt should be at the top of the secondary clutch. Need to open up the secondary.
While standing beside the sled, looking at the clutch, grab the inside sheave (that's the half closest to the air box). Now wiggle that half and push inward (away from you) at the same time. The clutch should start opening up and the belt will fall down into the sheaves. That should give you enough slack to slip it off the secondary and then off the primary.
 

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^^^^^^^^^^^^^This is the easiest way to remove the belt on most sleds. It is difficult to hold the secondary open by yourself, so you may want to get some one to help you by pulling the belt of while you hold it.
 

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freak007 said:
thanks, but I have no way of getting my track off the ground... is there another way?
Quick and dirty way is to use a chunk of 2x4 or 4x4 long enough to have your track COMPELTELY off the ground.

If you can't use a 2x4 or any other piece of wood, a second person holding the back of the sled will work in a pinch
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Dutchman said:
Right now your belt should be at the top of the secondary clutch. Need to open up the secondary.
While standing beside the sled, looking at the clutch, grab the inside sheave (that's the half closest to the air box). Now wiggle that half and push inward (away from you) at the same time. The clutch should start opening up and the belt will fall down into the sheaves. That should give you enough slack to slip it off the secondary and then off the primary.
That is what I am looking for!! Now how do adjust the tension and how much slack should there be?


Indy_500_Classic said:
freak007 said:
thanks, but I have no way of getting my track off the ground... is there another way?
Quick and dirty way is to use a chunk of 2x4 or 4x4 long enough to have your track COMPELTELY off the ground.

If you can't use a 2x4 or any other piece of wood, a second person holding the back of the sled will work in a pinch
Ohh i know how to get it off the ground... I usually use a jackstand... the reason I can't get it off the ground is because it is sitting on the back of my trailer (5x8 utility not a tilt bed) and I don't have the energy to unload it... and the reload it without ramps... I usually back into a snowbank and drive back on [;)]
 

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I have found it easiest to do it the way Dutchman says to do it, that way your not fighting anything else. You just push in and turn clockwise on the inner side of the secondary with the brake on or the track on the ground. I find it is more of a struggle with the track off the ground because it wants to spin and you lose your spot and have to start over. my .02
 

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^^^^Thats the way to do it for sure. You have to get the belt down in the secondary, if you don't your yanking on your crank or maybe taking out a seal.
After you replace the belt run it and then flip the cover back over....The belt shoud be 1/16 of a inch higher than the secondary diameter. Also put the belt on so you can read the numbers....
 

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Hold the brake with your right hand, with your left hand grasp the belt just ahead of the secondary and pull up- this forces the sheaves open and you can flip the belt off with one hand in about 3 seconds.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
thanks, I have gotten the belt off and back on now... I would like to know how much slack it should have and how to adjust it...
 

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Take a straight edge of some kind (yard stick) and lay it on the top of your primary and secondary clutches. Push down on the belt midway between the clutches- you should have about 1 1/4" of deflection. Adjustment for this is on the outside of your secondary clutch- should be a little slotted collar at the center with some numbers. Your belt should ride about 1/8" above secondary clutch sheave.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
cool, thanks!! My belt currently rides ~1/16" above the sheave and has ~3" of deflection... Collar is currently set on 3, which was should I go to tighten it?
 

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Thanks

its actualy very simple, easiest way is with the track of the ground,place the rear end on a stand or some kinda support, put a hand on the belt near the secondary clutch (rear most clutch) and start to work the belt around and off the clutch while at the same time turning the clutch, hence having the track of the ground to make the turning of the clutch easier, it should slip off fairly easy, if that is tough then continue to do what i just explaind but get the belt so it will stay have way off the clutch bye its self and continue to turn the clutch but at the same time turn the primary with it (foward most clutch) wich will aid in truning the secondary. once you get it the first time it a breeze to go from their.

with a good COLD belt the deflection should be (with some sort of sraitedge across both clutches on top of belt) should be around 1/2 inch when pushed till tension comes out of belt.
This worked great as I was trying to do it with the track on the ground before. As for the adjustments on a 2005 Indy 500 Classic it takes a 3/8 wrench and is a piece of cake to do. Just loosen the three bolts on the driven, rear clutch, and rotate the plate to the second from the left for starters. Tighten them up and run the sled, even on the stand. Shut it down and check the deflection. Mine is about 1 inch with that setting. On the stand the track turns some but not when it's on the ground. I gained 25 mph by just adjusting after putting the new belt on. The old belt had a half dozen teeth missing and that was causing a clanking noise before. Glad it didn't let go on my 85 mile trip the other day. Now, off to buy a new spare.
 
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