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how do you know when the belt is no good no more and needs to be replaced ? .. i have a SXR 700 and its always makeing a squealing noise from the belt .. so i dont know if i need a new one or not and if thats just how it is ..and can a belt give better power and is a aftermarked belt just a good as the ones that come with it
 

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Your belt should be replaced at least every 2 years or 1000 miles.
I know some guys that go buy a new belt every year.
You will notice much better throttle response with a new belt.
Belt squeal can also come from mis-aligned clutches, your manual should cover how to check that.
 

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you should be able to visibly see at least 1/8 inch of belt sticking up over the top of your secondary clutch, also measure the width of the belt, not sure what spec is for that sled, but when in doubt call a dealer or consult your manual
 

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Originally posted by newf XLT
[br]and can a belt give better power and is a aftermarked belt just a good as the ones that come with it
IMO, aftermarket belts work differently on each individual machine. Sometimes they are better and sometimes they are worse than OEM. For example, my 600 always worked the best with a Dayco Ultimax II belt, however, my 440 performed the best using the specified OEM belt. One thing to keep in mind is that even though both belts may have the same dimensions, it does not mean that they are EXACTLY the same in every way, shape, or form. There may be a slight variance between OEM and aftermarket belts, even though they both fit your machine. You must decide which one works best for you.

I have noticed over time that OEM belts work very well and they should because they were designed specifically for your machine. Dayco also makes great belts that last a long time. Thier Ultimax series of belts are strong and last longer, but that is because they usually have a higher durometer rating in the rubber used. It works well in higher HP machines that can eat them up quickly. Durometer is a measurement of the hardness of the rubber, but more is not always better.

A softer belt will wear faster, but more importantly it allows more grip for the clutches puttimg more power to the ground. Kind of like having "slicks" on a drag car, it will grab better. I have taken note that OEM belts from the dealer have a tendency to be slightly softer, and that is why i only use OEM belts on certain machines like my 440 to help with awesome holeshots!

Kevlar cords withing the belts are trully a break-through for high HP machines that need a strong belt. Without this technology, we would never be able to harness the fury of mod sleds approaching 300 HP. Nearly all snowmobile belts have it now, so no worries. If you see a cord popped-out on your worn belt, it's time to replace it! If your belt gets too skinny, your losing performance. That's just one reason that the new MX-Z REV uses a wider-than-normal belt; to maintain strength for more consistant performance.

Belts with cogs on the top side provide more air turbulence surrounding the belt which helps keep the belt COOL. Get one if it's available for your machine.

Stay away from cheap hardware store belts with some name you've never heard of. They are cheap because they're made cheap.

I change my belt once or twice a year, but that's just me. I wear them out quickly...[:D]
 

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I just replaced the belt on my sled after 1800mi. I held the new belt next to the old and couldn't really tell any difference at all. But like some have said, after 1800mi I figured it was do anyways. It's been a year and a half since I've last ridden the sled, so as far as comparing perfromance goes, I don't really even remember how it 'used' to go but it can't hurt, eh.
 

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If your sled is at idle and it’s squealing, IMO that's bad, it means you could be burning flat spots on the inside of your belt. ***WITHOUT KNOWING ANYTHING ABOUT YOUR CLUTCH AND IT’S SETUP*** I'd say the ride height of your secondary is set too high, meaning at idle, your belt could be sticking out of the secondary too far.

Although, as Megaman pointed out, with inconsistencies between belts and manufacturers, you may have installed a belt that was slightly shorter than your previous belts, which would also cause the same result.

I change my belt at least every year. Period.

It’s a habit I have always had and will always stick too. Even if I only ride my sled for 300 miles in a season, like I did last year, that thing is replaced at the beginning of the new season. It provides a bit of reassurance that I always have a belt that does not have too many miles on it.
 

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If it's belt squealing as you decelerate that's pretty normal for a Yamaha, otherwise check out what the other members have to say
 

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I had a problem using the gates extreme belts in two of my cat sleds. They were shorter than the OEM belts causing them to run to the side and squeel. They also made it hard starting because they wanted to grind around the primary hub and actually creep the sled forward. You can check this by running at idle with the track elevated. It should not turn.

I have used aftermarket belts just because they were more readily available, but prefer factory. I read an article that said aftermarket belts change the angle or length of the belt slightly to get around patent infringements. My advice is to change the belt and see if it helps. IMO you should have a spare belt anyway, so trying a different one won't be to costly.
 

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when i had my cluth worked on , the guy told me , that if EVER your machine starts squeling or just at idle your machine feels like it wants to move forward ,,
Then what you have to do is remove a couple of the spacer in the middle of the secondary clutch ,, do so until you only see 1/8 of the belt going over the secondary. ,, should solve problem
 

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You can adjust the secondary to take care of this, but if the belt is short (like mine was) then the belt ends up riding lower in the secondary and you end up starting at a higher gear ratio.
 
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