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Discussion Starter #1
My neighbors has been running his sled on and off a little in the summer but just letting it idle. When he went to start it today it started fine ran for a bit and than he turned it off. When he went to restart it, it would not start. He ended up flooding the engine so the spark plugs were shot. I went down and put new spark plugs in it gaped em and all that happy jazz. It started right up but had not power, it ran but just sluggish. Kind of sounds like the carbs are just full of "stuff". He called a dealer and the dealer said the same thing, and is gonna charge him like $300 to look at it and clean the carbs. When i asked if it could be cheaper to just put in carb cleaner and let the engine run for a while to clean everything out the dealre said it would cause more damage and to just bring it in. I would offer to clean the carbs myself, but i am not a mechanic. I would do it on my own sled but not my neighbors. So i guess my question is does it sound like a carb problem and is the dealer just feeind him bull about the carb cleaner to make some doe?
 

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Sounds like a carb problem to me. Depending on the temp where you are, If it was warmer than usually riding conditions, its going to be slugish as most sleds are jetted for -20 factory. If it was warm it could have been a combination of fouled plugs, a plugged up main jets that caused it too leaner and run good and then completely plugged, or plugged up pilots will make it not want to idle, and pilots plug up easy. I would search around and find a post about cleaning them, its really not hard at all and should be done yearly as preseason maintenance.

Basically just unscrew slide caps and remove slide assembly from carb(without adjusting cable nuts on top). Then unhook the fuel and vaccuum lines remembering which one went where. Once the carbs are free simply drain the bowl(dont even have to, but a lot cleaner) and then remove the bowl cover. Then clean both the pilot jet and main jets with carb cleaner and compressed air. Make sure all the passages are clean as well.

It may be easier if you havent done it before to remove one at a time, that way you wont be as confused as which hose or line connects where.

Oh yea, make sure you clean the carb throat and bowl itself, basically all internals, that way you wont just suck up more varnish(gunk) into the jets right away.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah that is what i figured it was, but just wanted to make sure before i started ripping things apart. Prob get started on it this week since the temp is suppose to go from the teens up to the fortys and 50s next week.

Thanx
 

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Do a quick search on this site. There are a couple complete walkthrus with pictures on how to clean and check your carbs. Heres a link to one of them.
http://www.snowmobilefanatics.com/articles/default.asp?cid=2&aid=13
 

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you can also put a new fuel filter in a sled sitting in the off season the gas gets tarnished and could plug the jets in the carbs drain the old gas and try fresh stuff its really not that hard to do once you start getting in to it they are pretty basic go to that link it will help you alot try new plugs good luck
 

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Hey thanx for all the sugestions guys, got the carbs apart today and all cleane up, put some new aprak plugs in it and got the old gas out and put new in. Runs like a top now, my neighbor is pleased, and i made a few bucks. thanks again
 
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