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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys so i went to the local snowmobile dealer and asked them a couple of questions about the clutch set up for Fuji motors because i figured the 400s 440s and 500s would be the same. Anyways i asked what what springs i should use and they didn't know off hand so they looked in the books they had and they said that there books didn't go back that far so that wasn't a big help. Then as i was leaving the guy said even if I wanted to clutch one of these snowmobiles i would tear up the belts like every 20 miles and i said even if i used a harder compound one and changed the weights and he still said ya. is he right and whats a good set up im fairly new to this stuff so go easy.
thanks
 

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I couldn't tell you what springs, weights, and helix you need, but as for not being able to swap these things that couldn't be further from the truth. It just all depends on how aggressive you make it, if you make it to aggressive then yes maybe you will run into problems but to say you can't change anything that guy is a moron.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
ssracing said:
I couldn't tell you what springs, weights, and helix you need, but as for not being able to swap these things that couldn't be further from the truth. It just all depends on how aggressive you make it, if you make it to aggressive then yes maybe you will run into problems but to say you can't change anything that guy is a moron.
ya i asked him if i could set up a 1995 xcr 440 for engaging at 5200-5500 and he said that that would blow belts even faster. and by the way the guy was from parts unlimited
 

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the better you dial in the clutch, the longer the belt life, and the better overall performance of your sled. i wont get into specifics, but heat is caused from friction, or belt slipping in this case, due to improper calibration on the clutching(both clutches).this is one of the leading causes of belt failure. if that shop didnt have the set-up info you were looking for, find a better shop. as for the 52-5500 engagement, yes, that's not only hard on belts, but all the components of the drive train. in my opinion, with the exception of drag racing, thats way to high of engagement for any sled. think of it as revving up a car motor and dumping the clutch. and then do that all day long stopping and starting. somethings gotta give.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
ya it does seem kinda high but ive heard about like zr 500s that engage at 7200 IM LIKE MAN 7200 thats amost like 1000 rpm less than when it reaches its its peak rpm. anyways whats a good rpm to engage at for those sleds i can probably find the springs
 

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Like what snowdad said, as long as your belt is either making 0% contact or 100% contact with the clutches (meaning the belt is either not moving or moving without slipping) you aren't wearing the belt out (theoretically). So when you clutch a sled, the clutch sheaves grab the belt faster [instead of easing into belt engagement, allowing more slippage] it's possible to extend belt life. Of course, that has it's limits- you don't want it to engage too high (unless you're drag racing) just as snowdad said.
 

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snowdad4 said:
the better you dial in the clutch, the longer the belt life, and the better overall performance of your sled. i wont get into specifics, but heat is caused from friction, or belt slipping in this case, due to improper calibration on the clutching(both clutches).this is one of the leading causes of belt failure. if that shop didnt have the set-up info you were looking for, find a better shop. as for the 52-5500 engagement, yes, that's not only hard on belts, but all the components of the drive train. in my opinion, with the exception of drag racing, thats way to high of engagement for any sled. think of it as revving up a car motor and dumping the clutch. and then do that all day long stopping and starting. somethings gotta give.
Agreed ^^^
Every part of that.

You want to engage around 4,200, so the almond round primary is going to be your friend there over the stock blue engaging you at 3,800 or so.
I like a little more back shift over the stock set up, so setting the secondary spring up in the tightest or second from tightest hole will help you there without cost.
The little Fugi's seam to make their best power at 7,500 to 7,700RPMs, so the stock springs will probably be good there.

While everything is apart, check out your weight bushings and your buttons.
Clean everything up so that you can see everything going on there.

The small Fugi's don't have a ton of power, so gearing down 1 tooth on the smaller gear will help with the quickness with out sacrificing too much from on top.
You will definately feal the difference there and smile.

Jet per specs for your elevation and riding temp to get your baseline, and adjust as your piston wash "directs" you

Doing all of this will definately help your performance, and only cost about $50
There will be more tuning on the clutches from there, maybe a helix and a stiffer secondary, then weighting it to still hit the right RPM, but save that part to see what you want the sled to do differently after this initial set up., if anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Student Driver said:
snowdad4 said:
the better you dial in the clutch, the longer the belt life, and the better overall performance of your sled. i wont get into specifics, but heat is caused from friction, or belt slipping in this case, due to improper calibration on the clutching(both clutches).this is one of the leading causes of belt failure. if that shop didnt have the set-up info you were looking for, find a better shop. as for the 52-5500 engagement, yes, that's not only hard on belts, but all the components of the drive train. in my opinion, with the exception of drag racing, thats way to high of engagement for any sled. think of it as revving up a car motor and dumping the clutch. and then do that all day long stopping and starting. somethings gotta give.
Agreed ^^^
Every part of that.

You want to engage around 4,200, so the almond round primary is going to be your friend there over the stock blue engaging you at 3,800 or so.
I like a little more back shift over the stock set up, so setting the secondary spring up in the tightest or second from tightest hole will help you there without cost.
The little Fugi's seam to make their best power at 7,500 to 7,700RPMs, so the stock springs will probably be good there.

While everything is apart, check out your weight bushings and your buttons.
Clean everything up so that you can see everything going on there.

The small Fugi's don't have a ton of power, so gearing down 1 tooth on the smaller gear will help with the quickness with out sacrificing too much from on top.
You will definately feal the difference there and smile.

Jet per specs for your elevation and riding temp to get your baseline, and adjust as your piston wash "directs" you

Doing all of this will definately help your performance, and only cost about $50
There will be more tuning on the clutches from there, maybe a helix and a stiffer secondary, then weighting it to still hit the right RPM, but save that part to see what you want the sled to do differently after this initial set up., if anything.
thanks this might make me sound a little stupid but what jets should i be running from temps around -5 to 25 degrees F and elevation around 1000-2000 feet
 

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Student Driver has you in the right direction. I am assuming this sled you are trying to clutch is the '87 Indy Trail? If so, should be a narrow roller clutch. The Almond Primary spring might be a bit stiff for the Indy TRail, IMO would stay with the stock spring and gear down one tooth as SD indicated, and play with a 36 degree straight Helix to start.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
polaris1man said:
Student Driver has you in the right direction. I am assuming this sled you are trying to clutch is the '87 Indy Trail? If so, should be a narrow roller clutch. The Almond Primary spring might be a bit stiff for the Indy TRail, IMO would stay with the stock spring and gear down one tooth as SD indicated, and play with a 36 degree straight Helix to start.
thanks im trying to clutch the indy 400 to
 
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