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Anyone with cultching combos for 02 600 xc sp? I run stock at 0-2000 ft w/ 144 pics.

Also anyone lower the gear rotio and was it worth it? What did you have to do to the clutching if anything?

I want a quick responsive trail machine that still can get up and run in the straits and on the lake.

Thanks for any input you have.
 

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Sorry I don't know much about clutching yet, but maybe try "HOT TO GO RACING" . They work a lot with Polaris products, and a guy I know deals with them and really likes their stuff.

"tie wrap it wide open"
 

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Well, I'll tell you my little secret. Call Erlandson, EPI, and ask for Chad Erlandson. If he is not busy or out of town, he will talk to you personally. He'll ask you many questions on what kind of sled you have, stock or modified, how you ride, how much you weight, what you are looking for in performance (trail set up-drag set up) so on and on and on. These guys know Polaris like the back of their hands. They will tell you what works and what doesnt from years of testing. If they cant make it go, forget it. Now you know my secret. Dont tell anyone else!! OK

'HAMMER DOWN !!'
 

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I learned alot about clucthing last year when I ran grass drags. Now I don't know what you are running in 2000 ft. I've never heard of any speed runs at that length. Grass drags are typically 500 ft and you hook up really well. So this advice may be different for you. As far as gearing, there is alot of acceleration to gain there. You want a low enough ratio to where you use up every thing in the sled and you cross the line at your top speed at the rpm for your engine. If you top out and start to over rev before the finish line then you are not using all of your sleds potential. You want to be accelerating all the way to the end. Now assuming that you are hooking up off the line, you need to get some heavier wheights for the primary. You want to run the heaviest weights that you can and still pull your rpms. With that sled you should be at 7900 rpms. If you get some adjustable weights from SLP or a Thunder shift weight kit, this makes it alot easier because they allow you to add very small incriments of weight exactly where you want it. The more weight you add, the rpms will drop more. The weight you add to the tip will affect your topend rpm, and the weight you add to the heel will affect the low end. Also the overall weight will affect you throught the shift range. You can compensate for this by increasing secondary spring preload and by helix changes. The tighter the secondary, the lower gear the clutches will be in. This will raise your rpms back up. The steeper angle on the helix, the less preload on the secondary spring there is. Your primary spring can also have an affect on upshift and egagement. Also, don't neglect you suspension setup. Get the weight transfer to where you can hook up but don't pull the skis to where your out of control. When you are going for straightline acceleration, you have terrible backshift. This will not be a good trail setup. But when you get it right, you will be able to beat alot of sleds.
 
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