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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Some background first: I have a 2001 Polaris Trail Touring. It's not in great shape, but it was running just fine when I bought it last fall. My level of experience with internal combustion engines is very low, but I'm confident with mechanical applications in general from working six years as a jet aircraft mechanic. Right now I have the belt off this sled to make some repairs to the suspension, so now is probably the best time for me to address this issue. This just started happening this spring, when I started the machine up one day. It just took off all by itself, and I stayed with it and rode it back around in a circle, and shut it off. It's still happening. Every time I start it, the engine just goes wide open all by itself. I know this is going to cause a problem later, especially when it gets cold here. When it gets cold here, it gets really cold. We usually let our machines warm up for a half hour before riding in winter here. After this problem became apparent, I asked a friend about it, and he told me to adjust my throttle stop screws on the carbs. He described them to me, and I went to look at it several times, and just could not find them. He finally gave in, and came over to look at the machine himself, and told me they were missing. So I purchased new ones(along with the springs), and they are installed, and appear to be working just fine. The engine still takes off every time I start it though.

Any thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
ethan.justinger said:
is the trottle stuck in one place
Well, I don't believe so. I'll have to go check. I know it's not so wide open that it can't rev any higher, but it is plenty to make the machine go all by itself when the belt is hooked up.

All I'm doing to make sure the throttle isn't stuck is to take off the tops of the carbs, pull the throttle, and make sure the throttle linkage moves, right?
 

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Sounds like you need to check your belt and your clutches. Your primary might not be fully disengaging.
 

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well that happen with my mini bike and i just oiled it up and kept moving it back and forth
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
flatlander_summit said:
Your primary might not be fully disengaging.
Please elaborate. What do you mean by primary. I'm not familiar with internal combustion engine jargon.
 

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Your primary (or drive clutch) is the clutch coming directly off of the engine, the secondary is also known as the driven clutch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
srx_600 said:
Your primary (or drive clutch) is the clutch coming directly off of the engine, the secondary is also known as the driven clutch.
Oh, ok. Thanks for explaining that to me. The drive belt is new as of this winter. I just replaced it because the machine was used, and didn't want to have to worry about it. Knowing what I know now, I would've just wrapped the replacement around the back seat or handlebars, and just gone until the belt snapped. They're not all that hard to replace. On the other hand, I wouldn't want my belt to snap while I was chasing down a caribou either... Anyway, I'm not sure that there is anything wrong with the primary. The machine goes just fine with the belt on. It's the engine that is over revving by itself. This happens regardless of the condition of the belt(it's completely disconnected right now, for example). Are there other belts I should check on the engine?
 

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Throe said:
ethan.justinger said:
is the trottle stuck in one place
Well, I don't believe so. I'll have to go check. I know it's not so wide open that it can't rev any higher, but it is plenty to make the machine go all by itself when the belt is hooked up.

All I'm doing to make sure the throttle isn't stuck is to take off the tops of the carbs, pull the throttle, and make sure the throttle linkage moves, right?
Pull the air box and stick your fingers into the carbs, there should be about a 3/16" gap depending on your sled model. Check your cables. Has the coating come out of the crimped area. That will cause your throttle to stick open just a tad.
 

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make sure the carbs are completely shutting when you let off the throttle. Coulb be a bad air leak causing this too.
 
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