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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a 1999 Arctic cat 600 powder special EFI and i was swapping the stator and broke the flywheel in the process, so I ordered another one when it came I noticed it had 4 magnets instead of 6 like the old one (picture below) and so I did some research on he internet and couldn't find anything about how that affects timing and such. i put it on and it started like it should but it has a bog and takes forever for it to get up to speed, which it did not do when I had the other flywheel on.
...SIDE NOTE
the stator I replaced was a cheap aftermarket one, I found on eBay, could that be the problem not the flywheel

The one with 6 magnets is the one that was originally on my sled.
The one with 4 is he one that currently on.

FYI: these are just random pictures that I found that look like the ones I'm talking about.

thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
As I understand they are not interchangeable.. The pulse timing from the stator is a different duration/time when using 4 vs 6 magnets. If you align the key slots on each flywheeyou will see the magnet start/stop locations do not align. B.
Huh 馃.
I would think that if the timing was off it wouldn鈥檛 even run. It revs up. But maybe that鈥檚 why it鈥檚 bogging. Any thoughts on that.
Thanks a bunch for your input
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I would suggest checking the resistance of the stator using a multimeter to ensure that it's within the manufacturer's specifications. This can help you determine if the stator is the root cause of the issue. You can usually find this information in your snowmobile's service manual.

If the stator is found to be faulty, you may want to consider purchasing a higher quality replacement from a reputable supplier to ensure that it provides the correct amount of current to the ignition system. In some cases, a faulty stator can also cause damage to other components in the electrical system, so it's important to address any issues as soon as possible.

Regarding the flywheel, if you're confident that it's installed correctly and the engine timing is correct, you may want to consider replacing it with a flywheel that has the correct number of magnets for your engine. This can help ensure that your snowmobile is operating at its best.

it's possible that the aftermarket stator you purchased is causing the bogging and slow acceleration you're experiencing with your snowmobile. Additionally, the flywheel with fewer magnets could also be contributing to the issue. I would recommend checking the stator's resistance and considering purchasing a higher quality replacement if necessary. If the issue persists, you may want to have a mechanic take a closer look to diagnose the problem.
thanks a bunch for taking the time to say all that.
before I put the stator in I checked the resistance for high and low ignition and they both check within what they were supposed to, but to my understanding, a stator can still be bad even if it checks those boxes.
 
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