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What is the difference between the two? Both can be rebuilt and both are gas. Is there a major difference that makes one a better shock? I always though that Fox was the better choice but it seems now days you are seeing more of the Ryde FX on sleds.
 

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Originally posted by RED_XCR_440
[br]What is the difference between the two? Both can be rebuilt and both are gas. Is there a major difference that makes one a better shock? I always though that Fox was the better choice but it seems now days you are seeing more of the Ryde FX on sleds.
If you ask me i think that fox is still better . There is alot of reasons why you see alot of ryde fx . companies like polaris and others will go with the best bang for the buck . I think that both are a great shock but ryde fx may be sheper for polaris to put on their sleds . Fox is realy expensive . but i thinks its a superrior shock
 

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I have a Pro X with the Ryde FX fusion and solo shocks and I do not like them. I find they fade quicker and the fox are more responsive (factory settings). It also seems that the Ryde's take more to rebuild, some you have to let sit for longer some upto 72hrs (according to Ryde), before you install them. I am still learning all about his shock stuff myself.
 

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The Rydes do not fade nearly as fast as a mono tube FOX. A Ryde is more durable and will go longer between servicing. In my book FOX/ACT are inferior to Ryde in all aspects.

As far as having to wait for a long period of time, 72 hrs is really excessive. The reason you have to wait longer is to get all the air out of the oil, because on a mono tube Ryde there are no end caps like on a Fox/ACT, therefore you have to set the piston into the bore before you add oil where as a Fox/ACT you remove the end cap the fill the oil and set the floating piston depth so you dont have to wait as long. No big deal the longest I ever had to wait was about a hour. The trick is to chill the oil and pour it slowly as to not agetate it.

One nice thing about Ryde 9200 series is it responds well to valving changes where as a Fox it's trail and error to find the sweet spot.
I see a lot less failures with Rydes than Fox.

If you want the best, then look for Ohlins.
 

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Originally posted by Frosty
[br]The Rydes do not fade nearly as fast as a mono tube FOX. A Ryde is more durable and will go longer between servicing. In my book FOX/ACT are inferior to Ryde in all aspects.

As far as having to wait for a long period of time, 72 hrs is really excessive. The reason you have to wait longer is to get all the air out of the oil, because on a mono tube Ryde there are no end caps like on a Fox/ACT, therefore you have to set the piston into the bore before you add oil where as a Fox/ACT you remove the end cap the fill the oil and set the floating piston depth so you dont have to wait as long. No big deal the longest I ever had to wait was about a hour. The trick is to chill the oil and pour it slowly as to not agetate it.

One nice thing about Ryde 9200 series is it responds well to valving changes where as a Fox it's trail and error to find the sweet spot.
I see a lot less failures with Rydes than Fox.

If you want the best, then look for Ohlins.
He knows his stuff. fox isnt as great of a shock as rydefc, go wityh ryde fc. they last longer take more abuse and are easy to get parts for.
 

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Not all ryde fx shocks are rebuildable. But comparing the rebuildable version I find the ryde fx hold up much better. Part of that is that the yuse a better oil from the factory. That is why I don't use fox oil on fox rebuilds. The 72 hours is for hte emulsion shokcs only whic I believe are only on the front skid of fan cooled pro x. There are a couple of negatives to ryde. The air valve is a high corrosion point especially on open trailer towed sleds. I am finding these harder to get out on 4 year old ryde fx shocks that have not been rebuilt previously. Also the lower eye on the front skid of polaris wera out kind of fast and finally some of the bearing caps on ryde fx can't have the seals replaced. Over all though even with these issues I prefer ryde fx. As to valving they both use the same valve stacks.
 

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Ryde FX's are tops in my book over the Fox's, they last longer and with the adjustable ones they can be used in all kinds of conditions.
 

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I have a set of Ryde service sheets on how to rebuil their shocks. They say on both the resivoir and the shock tube to fill with oil completely(resivoir) and up to the threads(tube) then insert push floatinf piston to specified depth(using tool) in the oil and cap the resivoir. If you do this that makes sure there is no air in the resivoit. For the tube it is the same thing push down on the assembly and oil will over flow and tell it bottoms out on the body. This again makes sure that the shock is completely full of oil. The way I understand is that you chill the oil(slows the pour and condenses the fluid. You put the whole rod assembly down the tube and pour the oil. If you do this you create a bit of an air gap under the assembly. Then you pour the oil in the tube and cap off. How do you make sure all the air is out of the shock? If you let sit for an hour the oil warms up but there still may be air traped under the piston assembly, no? If you cap this off you still may have air and when the shock starts to work it foams up cause the air "mixes" with the oil(contamination). I'm just learing, your way still could work you probably work the shock back and forth to the air out of it I guess. Also how do you take into accoount for the oil expansion when it warms up. I have also been told on Ryde shocks that it depends which way the rod is on the sled (up or down) down being like on the front of my Pro X determines which way you have the shock positioned (up or down) to let the air bleed out. If the rod faces down and you have it so the rod is pointing up when bleeding air not all the air escapes. ryde has a few service bulletins on how to rebuild their shocks and I have only read 1 1/2 out of 3 or so, so I do have more reading to do. Talking and reading about what you guys have to say sure helps me though, the shocks play a major role in the sled and can make a good ride or a bad ride.
 
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