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well I'm thinking about studding my track just wondering if someone could point me in the right direction.just need to know how many?and length? its a stock 96 ultra Sp track 121 with one inch lugs.
 

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here is a link for you with a recommended sizes and how many to put on.
http://www.royaldistributing.com/servlet/MiddleRedirect?page=index1.html
edit- page 273 of the winter catalogue
 

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96 studboy 1.175 down the middle with dubblebacker plates with tallboy nuts.
 

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A good rule of thumb is, 1 stud per horsepower, with a minimum of 96.
I got this recommendation from My part's guy, who's been pretty succesful in grass and ice drag's.
Rick
 

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dont go more the 144 down the center after that all you are doing is wasting your time and money and adding more rotating mass then needed i just took out 96 studs out of my
mach-z800 and lost five pounds doing so it seemed to hook a little better to . if you want them you can have them all i ask is for you to pay shiping thay are in good shape and only have cuppel of miles on them here is a pic
[attachment=50695][attachment=50696]
 

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I'd go with 120-144.
 

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I have preeched this for years ever since I screwed up a track really bad for putting to many studs in it. You have to consider the example of people laying on a board of nails when it comes to studs. If there were only 20 nails on the board, would anyone be able to lay on it? The answer is no. The more studs you put in a track, the less pressure they are going to have on the ground creating less traction. The fewer studs you can put in a track and get away with by not having tear outs, the better off you are. You are going to be able to dig in better and have less rotating weight aswell. When I put 240 studs in my V-max 4 800, I hammered it on the ice and the track just spun underneath me. I was confused for a little them took half the studs out on the ice and track didn't slip one bit. For your situation I would probably go with 120 studs. This should be a good combo for you in terms of durability and traction. Hope this helps everyones understanding.
 

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I would go with 120 minimum or 144 max.

On my 96 ultra sp I had 144. Was a little much for 6" carbides that I had.
On my 98 xc 700 I had 120(60 woodys modified, 60 road runners) It hooked up great. No slip issues.
 

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[attachment=50739] i have 96 ill send them to you in the morning
 

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you should get 96 woodys studs, thats what i got and there great not too much but does the job excellent
 

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Originally posted by RX1CBPP
[br]I have preeched this for years ever since I screwed up a track really bad for putting to many studs in it. You have to consider the example of people laying on a board of nails when it comes to studs. If there were only 20 nails on the board, would anyone be able to lay on it? The answer is no. The more studs you put in a track, the less pressure they are going to have on the ground creating less traction. The fewer studs you can put in a track and get away with by not having tear outs, the better off you are. You are going to be able to dig in better and have less rotating weight aswell. When I put 240 studs in my V-max 4 800, I hammered it on the ice and the track just spun underneath me. I was confused for a little them took half the studs out on the ice and track didn't slip one bit. For your situation I would probably go with 120 studs. This should be a good combo for you in terms of durability and traction. Hope this helps everyones understanding.
I'll have to disagree with this. You want a balance of traction and stress per stud. The less studs you put in, the more stress you will have on each stud.More stress = easier track damage.
I would go 168 minimum on a 700.
 

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If you read the bottom I said the least amount of studs you can get away with by not having tear outs. If installed correctly, 120 is more then enough for that sled. You can run 168 if you would like but if you do, you are loosing performance all the way across the board. You are going to have less hook up out of the hole because your studs wont have enough pressure on them, and you are going to lose top speed by throwing another 3-4 pounds worth of studs in the track. The minimum amount you can get away with.
 

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Originally posted by RX1CBPP
[br]If you read the bottom I said the least amount of studs you can get away with by not having tear outs. If installed correctly, 120 is more then enough for that sled. You can run 168 if you would like but if you do, you are loosing performance all the way across the board. You are going to have less hook up out of the hole because your studs wont have enough pressure on them, and you are going to lose top speed by throwing another 3-4 pounds worth of studs in the track. The minimum amount you can get away with.
I agree 100%.The track acts like paddles.If you have to many studs loosening the snow there is less for the paddles to get a grip on.On extremly hard surface studs are great,but more is not always the best.If your worried about pull threws,use the sno-cross rule;All studs must be at least 3 1/2 inches from outside of track and have to follow a lug with no more than 3/8 of an inch sticking up above the lugs.This is to minimize studs from being ripped out and thrown at other riders.The 3/8 sticking above the lug will cut into the ice but wont loosen too much snow so the lugs can do there job.
 

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I'm pretty sure mine has 96 and it hooks plenty good 1998 700 xc
 

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i only have 96 and it hooks realy good
 
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