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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alright, I know a lot of people on here will not agree with me on here but I figure I may as well post it anyways. I've done this twice with great, strong results. If you miss one step, your plastic could end up looking like crap.

If you are impatient, stop reading, and dont bother going on.

DO NOT USE ANYTHING THAT IS NOT PLASTIC PAINT!!! Duplicolor or walmart brand $0.98 cans will not do the job.

1. First things first, you are going to so called, prep your panels or plastic. To do so remove them from the machine. You will first wash them, then find any rough spots. Scrub them hard with a sponge. You may need to use a light sandpaper if they have been damaged by hitting things ( The bottoms of the panels on my Rev had scuffing from wear and tear. So I lightly sanded them with 400 grit, then 800 grit, and they were still somewhat choppy, but good enough for the job ). Then wash them again. Make sure there isnt any belt dust, dirt, grime etc... on the plastic.

2. Get your paint. I prefer Krylon Fusion. You must also decide if you want a flat, or gloss color. For one side panel, I used 2 cans total. They are about $4.50 a can. Make sure you dont get the wrong shade of color or else you'll get a horrible mixed look. You can also get a $2 spray handle which makes your sweeps much better.

3. Put your panels somewhere that bugs, dust, or dirt will not touch them. I put them on a saw horse in the middle of my yard. Make sure you can get most angles on the pieces, and also make sure they are all sitting a decent ways apart so over-spray wont build up on your other pieces.

4. Now to actually paint. Make sure your panels are 100% dry and clean, I can't stress that enough. Make sure the can is AT LEAST 8 inches away. Dont face the can at plastic when you pull the trigger, point it about 3-4 inches away. This will insure you dont get globs of paint building up on your plastic. Then not to slow, but not to fast go across the plastic with the can. Your not looking for a dark color your first streak. Lets use my panels as an example. They are black, and I used white paint. You could barley see the white after I was done with my first coat of paint. Then move on to the next piece.

5. Let the pieces dry for 5 minutes after the first coat. Then do the same thing again on all of them. You should still see the base plastic color just fine. Let them sit for 5 minutes once again. This time, come from a different angle to insure the paint is setting in all the right spots. See if there is focus spots that need more work than others. After your 4th coat, it should start looking more of the paint color than the paint. Now let them sit for AT LEAST 15 minutes. Now repeat the painting steps again twice. Allow them to sit for 15 more minutes.

6. Finally, you should get all your color on ( it should take up to 10 very light coats, maybe more ). Double check and recheck you got all the cracks, creases, and angles painted. Let it sit for up to an hour in the sun, with the temperature over 60 degrees.

7. Time for clear coat. I use Krylon Fusion gloss clear paint for this part. Do one light coat of clear and let it sit for 15 minutes. Now if you want a sparkle or something of that sort, use the color you want, and stand back 3+ feet, and lightly walk around spraying it, making sure not to make any real buildup. This part is optional though. After waiting the clear paint to dry, or waiting another 15 minuets for your sparkle or flake to dry, hit with another layer of clear coat. Then let it sit for 15 minutes, and clear coat it again. Then one more time.

8. DO NOT MOUNT THESE FOR AT LEAST 24 HOURS! Any real weight on them can smudge the paint right off before it gets time to bond, then you have to strip, and reprep the plastic which is no fun. Then mount what you need to.

9. Your panels will not be 100% dry for about 48 hours. The bonding process takes quite a bit of time, but you can safely mount them in 24 hours.

Heres a before and after:
BEFORE:
201042315255706_27886.jpg
AFTER:

201042919383784_27886.jpg

201042919391518_27886.jpg

2010429193940971_27886.jpg

Between paint and clear coat, you may see and feel rough spots ( rough edged plastic, etc... ), but the clear coat will mix with the paint and cause a smooth surface as well as added integrity. Good luck to those who follow this process.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, definitely.

And for metal painting, get those professionally stripped and powder coated or anodized.
 

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Krylon will not get within 50 feet of my machine, but I intend on keeping mine for a few years.

OK' step by step description of taking the Krylon approach though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes, thats why I said cheap.

I do know that I have strong nails, and I can run them as hard as I possibly can down my panels and it wont come off. I've painted other parts of sleds and they have lasted perfectly through winter.

And TRICKPaint, you do some amazing paint work, and you do it the correct way.
 

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sledcrusher said:
Yes, thats why I said cheap.

I do know that I have strong nails, and I can run them as hard as I possibly can down my panels and it wont come off. I've painted other parts of sleds and they have lasted perfectly through winter.[/color=red]

And TRICKPaint, you do some amazing paint work, and you do it the correct way.


You may have strong nails, but tree branches, ice, snow and roll overs WILL flake that paint off. Put one of those panels in your freezer and step on it and see what happens. Looks good for the time being though.


Not tryin to knock ya just sayin' don't suprised if you roll it in the winter time and it looks like crap, especially if you start racing that sled..
 

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Nice description. I used a similiar method on my fourwheeler and its on the paint's second season and only a couple little spots need touch up.


However, I HIGHLY reccomend spraying it the right way for peace of mind.
 

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sledcrusher said:
3. Put your panels somewhere that bugs, dust, or dirt will not touch them. I put them on a saw horse in the middle of my yard...
Isn't that a bit ironic? You try to put them somewhere without bugs, dust, and dirt...so you put them outside!? Last time I checked, there was a whole lot of particulate in the air...not to mention bugs, birds, and other such offspring of mother nature.
 

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TRICKPaint said:
Krylon will not get within 50 feet of my machine, but I intend on keeping mine for a few years[/color=red].

OK' step by step description of taking the Krylon approach though.


X2 here. I only use an automotive grade paint on mine and didn't spent that much more than you did.

I thought Krylon was for graffiti, you know "Say it with Krylon".

IMO, that piece you misted the black on, it looks "dirty". Should have left it all white.
 

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I fully prepped my 2 hoods for my sled (one I've painted twice) and sprayed them with Krylon Fusion paint and have had the same trouble with the Fusion vs a 98 cent can of Wal-Mart paint....It will flake! Your claim you can scratch your paint with a nail and it won't come off? I'll throw the BS flag on that to ANYTHING! You push as hard as you can with anything with a point and it will scratch anything, ANYTHING! Powdercoating won't stand up to being scratched with a sharp point like a nail. It might not "flake" but it will most definatly scratch, and a few more hits like that and all it takes is a little moisture and flakes will appear.

That being said, you're write up was good. The steps taken will make for a good initial paint job, I know mine did too for the first 1/2 season. But anything that is rattle canned on will flake eventually. I can't hate too much on it because my sled is sittin on a rattle can paint job too.
 

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Even though that'll flake RIGHT AWAY, if you wanted to spend the dough and have a pro do it I'd paint the hood too. My .02
 

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Hes talking about his fingernails, not nails for wood. but I don agree that adventually it will flake off from branches and ice chunks.

polarisIQmn said:
I fully prepped my 2 hoods for my sled (one I've painted twice) and sprayed them with Krylon Fusion paint and have had the same trouble with the Fusion vs a 98 cent can of Wal-Mart paint....It will flake! Your claim you can scratch your paint with a nail and it won't come off? I'll throw the BS flag on that to ANYTHING! You push as hard as you can with anything with a point and it will scratch anything, ANYTHING! Powdercoating won't stand up to being scratched with a sharp point like a nail. It might not "flake" but it will most definatly scratch, and a few more hits like that and all it takes is a little moisture and flakes will appear.

That being said, you're write up was good. The steps taken will make for a good initial paint job, I know mine did too for the first 1/2 season. But anything that is rattle canned on will flake eventually. I can't hate too much on it because my sled is sittin on a rattle can paint job too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yes, racing and ramping will definitely cause it to flake. Temperature will take its toll on the paint as well. Krylon Fusion has a lot of flex to it too.

And yes, I meant my fingernail. I think it'll take a pretty hard hit from a branch to as well. But eventually it will wear.
 

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sledcrusher said:
Yes, racing and ramping will definitely cause it to flake. Temperature will take its toll on the paint as well. Krylon Fusion has a lot of flex to it too.

And yes, I meant my fingernail. I think it'll take a pretty hard hit from a branch to as well. But eventually it will wear.
Thats my bad, I read that as using like a wood nail scratching at the paint. [BeerPull] had a few...

Chad
 

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i painted my brothers helmet black with that method 2 years ago. has not flaked at all. its been dropped on the cement too. but then again it baked in the trunk of my car for 2 months in the summer before it was used at all. idk if that helped or not. i like to think it did haha

Before

20099718241329_21898.jpg

after

200997182321735_21898.jpg

200997182254532_21898.jpg

201055235513621_21898.jpg

201055235515636_21898.jpg
 

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Alright, I know a lot of people on here will not agree with me on here but I figure I may as well post it anyways. I've done this twice with great, strong results. If you miss one step, your plastic could end up looking like crap.

If you are impatient, stop reading, and dont bother going on.

DO NOT USE ANYTHING THAT IS NOT PLASTIC PAINT!!! Duplicolor or walmart brand $0.98 cans will not do the job.

1. First things first, you are going to so called, prep your panels or plastic. To do so remove them from the machine. You will first wash them, then find any rough spots. Scrub them hard with a sponge. You may need to use a light sandpaper if they have been damaged by hitting things ( The bottoms of the panels on my Rev had scuffing from wear and tear. So I lightly sanded them with 400 grit, then 800 grit, and they were still somewhat choppy, but good enough for the job ). Then wash them again. Make sure there isnt any belt dust, dirt, grime etc... on the plastic.

2. Get your paint. I prefer Krylon Fusion. You must also decide if you want a flat, or gloss color. For one side panel, I used 2 cans total. They are about $4.50 a can. Make sure you dont get the wrong shade of color or else you'll get a horrible mixed look. You can also get a $2 spray handle which makes your sweeps much better.

3. Put your panels somewhere that bugs, dust, or dirt will not touch them. I put them on a saw horse in the middle of my yard. Make sure you can get most angles on the pieces, and also make sure they are all sitting a decent ways apart so over-spray wont build up on your other pieces.

4. Now to actually paint. Make sure your panels are 100% dry and clean, I can't stress that enough. Make sure the can is AT LEAST 8 inches away. Dont face the can at plastic when you pull the trigger, point it about 3-4 inches away. This will insure you dont get globs of paint building up on your plastic. Then not to slow, but not to fast go across the plastic with the can. Your not looking for a dark color your first streak. Lets use my panels as an example. They are black, and I used white paint. You could barley see the white after I was done with my first coat of paint. Then move on to the next piece.

5. Let the pieces dry for 5 minutes after the first coat. Then do the same thing again on all of them. You should still see the base plastic color just fine. Let them sit for 5 minutes once again. This time, come from a different angle to insure the paint is setting in all the right spots. See if there is focus spots that need more work than others. After your 4th coat, it should start looking more of the paint color than the paint. Now let them sit for AT LEAST 15 minutes. Now repeat the painting steps again twice. Allow them to sit for 15 more minutes.

6. Finally, you should get all your color on ( it should take up to 10 very light coats, maybe more ). Double check and recheck you got all the cracks, creases, and angles painted. Let it sit for up to an hour in the sun, with the temperature over 60 degrees.

7. Time for clear coat. I use Krylon Fusion gloss clear paint for this part. Do one light coat of clear and let it sit for 15 minutes. Now if you want a sparkle or something of that sort, use the color you want, and stand back 3+ feet, and lightly walk around spraying it, making sure not to make any real buildup. This part is optional though. After waiting the clear paint to dry, or waiting another 15 minuets for your sparkle or flake to dry, hit with another layer of clear coat. Then let it sit for 15 minutes, and clear coat it again. Then one more time.

8. DO NOT MOUNT THESE FOR AT LEAST 24 HOURS! Any real weight on them can smudge the paint right off before it gets time to bond, then you have to strip, and reprep the plastic which is no fun. Then mount what you need to.

9. Your panels will not be 100% dry for about 48 hours. The bonding process takes quite a bit of time, but you can safely mount them in 24 hours.

Heres a before and after:
BEFORE:
177228
AFTER:

177316

177320

177322

Between paint and clear coat, you may see and feel rough spots ( rough edged plastic, etc... ), but the clear coat will mix with the paint and cause a smooth surface as well as added integrity. Good luck to those who follow this process.
Sledcrusher you have the right approach but a re missing a couple of steps the prep job is the most important and you have the right approach but you can go to your local auto paint store and they will make almost any color in an erasol can and its not very expensive ask about the knockoff brand it would be comparable in price and real paint
 
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