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Discussion Starter #1
Specifically around the carburetor area. I can't believe Polaris would let the fuel,pulse and oil lines just lay there. I tied mine away from the steering post and oil pump lever, but there just has to be a missing bracket or clip somewhere. I would like some pics of the wire routing around the pull rope area as well. So if anyone has any they could post I would be grateful. I want to put this back together the right way and not half-assed like the previous owner had it. Thank you.
 

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I just put in a Indy 500 motor. I really don't think there is any specific, proper routing to this engine or any other engine I've done. Use common sense when routing. I go under the carbs from the fuel pump, tucked below the carb boot for the PTO carb No kinks or sharp turns. Same for Mag. Too long of fuel line can be a problem also, start long and trim as necessary. It also makes it easier if you use thin, flexible fuel line vs the thick, black Goodyear type. The thick line is the way to go for longetivity but harder to route.
I might be wrong as usual, but it's how I do it. You may be able to add a couple of clips if needed, but zip ties accomplish the same. I use zip ties to clean up the wiring too. The wiring can usually be tucked in without any issues with the recoil.
Dman
 

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Originally posted by Dman
[br]I just put in a Indy 500 motor. I really don't think there is any specific, proper routing to this engine or any other engine I've done. Use common sense when routing. I go under the carbs from the fuel pump, tucked below the carb boot for the PTO carb No kinks or sharp turns. Same for Mag. Too long of fuel line can be a problem also, start long and trim as necessary. It also makes it easier if you use thin, flexible fuel line vs the thick, black Goodyear type. The thick line is the way to go for longetivity but harder to route.
I might be wrong as usual, but it's how I do it. You may be able to add a couple of clips if needed, but zip ties accomplish the same. I use zip ties to clean up the wiring too. The wiring can usually be tucked in without any issues with the recoil.
Dman
I've worked on everthing from a 76 Colt SS to an XCR 700 - it seems it's only the newer sleds that have a good idea of wire/fuel line/ oil line routing. All the older stuff - like he said. Put it where it doesn't get in the way, no kinks, etc. One thing I've noticed to watch out for is the PTO carb - if it's too long or the inlet is angled wrong - it'll hit the belt. That's not good.
Zip ties work perfect - only thing is they aren't reusable so if you need to make a trail side repair - make sure you have some in your toolbox.
I prefer the big goodyear stuff. Over the years I've used everything from the spiffy blue stuff, to regular clear to the 1/4 inch stuff from an auto parts store on all my toys. And the rubber stuff holds up better - no cracks and doesn't get hard. I feel it's just as flexible as the smaller stuff, and you can loosen the clamp to remove it with the clamp staying on the end of the line (won't slide down anywhere)But the smaller stuff is just that; smaller and less bulky. And it looks nicer. But I'd rather do it once, have it last many years, with no worries of a crack leaning out my sled and blowing it up. But I also know people who change their fuel line every year to make sure that doesn't happen. Matter of preference I guess.
Oh - you CAN change the angle of the inlet on your carbs if you need to.
Just my 2 cents!

Bryan
 

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Originally posted by ibreakstuff
[br]
Originally posted by Dman
[br]I just put in a Indy 500 motor. I really don't think there is any specific, proper routing to this engine or any other engine I've done. Use common sense when routing. I go under the carbs from the fuel pump, tucked below the carb boot for the PTO carb No kinks or sharp turns. Same for Mag. Too long of fuel line can be a problem also, start long and trim as necessary. It also makes it easier if you use thin, flexible fuel line vs the thick, black Goodyear type. The thick line is the way to go for longetivity but harder to route.
I might be wrong as usual, but it's how I do it. You may be able to add a couple of clips if needed, but zip ties accomplish the same. I use zip ties to clean up the wiring too. The wiring can usually be tucked in without any issues with the recoil.
Dman
I've worked on everthing from a 76 Colt SS to an XCR 700 - it seems it's only the newer sleds that have a good idea of wire/fuel line/ oil line routing. All the older stuff - like he said. Put it where it doesn't get in the way, no kinks, etc. One thing I've noticed to watch out for is the PTO carb - if it's too long or the inlet is angled wrong - it'll hit the belt. That's not good.
Zip ties work perfect - only thing is they aren't reusable so if you need to make a trail side repair - make sure you have some in your toolbox.
I prefer the big goodyear stuff. Over the years I've used everything from the spiffy blue stuff, to regular clear to the 1/4 inch stuff from an auto parts store on all my toys. And the rubber stuff holds up better - no cracks and doesn't get hard. I feel it's just as flexible as the smaller stuff, and you can loosen the clamp to remove it with the clamp staying on the end of the line (won't slide down anywhere)But the smaller stuff is just that; smaller and less bulky. And it looks nicer. But I'd rather do it once, have it last many years, with no worries of a crack leaning out my sled and blowing it up. But I also know people who change their fuel line every year to make sure that doesn't happen. Matter of preference I guess.
Oh - you CAN change the angle of the inlet on your carbs if you need to.
Just my 2 cents!

Bryan
Well said.....I agree
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys, Yeah I have everything zip tied out of the way. I just thought there was something more to help keep the hoses away from moving parts. I guess the sled industry isn't up to automotive standards yet.
 
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