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My friend says that a sno sled can over heat from just idling for over 8 minutes according to him. is this true?
 

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depends on the sled and situation.

8 minutes isn't much time if the sled is cold and just started. takes almost 8 minutes to get the water up to operating temp.
 
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My friend says that a sno sled can over heat from just idling for over 8 minutes according to him. is this true?
No, I run my sled from time to time in the shed for much longer than that without overheating. I've ran a sled 20 to 30 minutes at a trail head in 20 degree temps without overheating. If it overheats in 8 minutes, something's wrong with the sled. I assume you mean a sled with a cold engine when started.
 

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I can't see that ever happening, not even if you drain the coolant. At idle a snowmobile engine is only making enough power to keep itself spinning. The BTU's simply aren't there, and what it does produce and transferred to the internals ( piston, head, cylinder, etc) is cooled off again by the incoming charge (fuel and air).

I will assume we are talking about 2-strokes. 4-strokes are different animal all together.
 

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My friend says that a sno sled can over heat from just idling for over 8 minutes according to him. is this true?
For MOST sleds, this is simply not true. You're friend is wrong.
 

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8 min? I let mine warm up for 10 min or so then shut if off to heat sink then after I am all ready I start it up for another 5 min and I'm off.

I don't know maybe if it was idling for 8 min in a 120* day in the desert it might?

I remember as a kid there was this guy at the Old Timers run in Lake Park MN (old snowmobile snow and run) and this guy would always let his colt 175 single popper run the whole day, even while showing it and it never overheated lol
This was a air cooled 70s 2 stroke though as well. Loose tolerances etc.
 

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My 2-stroke sleds could hardly get up to operating temperature at idle, never mind overheating.

Cause for concern after too much idling would be oil deposits on your exhaust valves and possibly fouling spark plugs. Especially on older carbureted machines. Newer fuel injected ones are better. I wouldn't worry about overheating too much.
 

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Depends on the sled, the motor, and the conditions.

Large motor, little venting through the belly pan, warmed up when you start it, warm temps outside. Possible.

Small motor, plenty of venting, cold motor when you start it, cold temps. Almost impossible.

For reference: I started my 600 Pro-R and my '98 440 (liquid) the other day for the first time in about six months. They were both in an enclosed trailer (clamshell), hoods closed. I started them and let them idle for about 15 minutes while I checked the slides, lubed the skid on the 600, and lubed the wheel bearings on the trailer. 15 minutes later (maybe longer), in 15 degree F temps, the 600 was at 115 degrees internal motor temp. That motor runs at any where from 129 to about 180 on the trails.
 

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some sleds get a bad blade so at idle the water pump is not pushing the fluid thru fast enough- when running the bad blades still push enough- might need to check water pump assembly
 
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