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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey All,

So I've been working little by little on trying to get my wife's '99 to steer a bit easier for her. Compaing it to my '98 is a night-and-day difference, as far as how much effort is needed to turn the skis. She likes how my 700 turns, but i don't like the power of thr 500 in comparison, so I don't just want to swap sleds with her, LOL!

So far I have played around with the front limiter strap a little bit, and noticed a slight improvement. But it's still not as easy to throw back and forth as the Wedge. It feels like there's much more weight distribution on the skis on her sled, and it seemed that I was able to drop the nose of the skid a little bit via the straps. Am I going in the right direction, or likely to cause other problems?

unfortunately I don't really know much about how my '98 was setup. It's still basically as I picked it up a few years ago, and has been great for me, obviously. Looking at the 2 side my side, it almost looks like the rear axle and wheels on the 98 are up, and the middle of the skid is carying most of the weight. On the 99, it looks like the rear axle is carying more of the load, and the nose of the skid looks suspended above the snow pack.

I've read a little about deep-snow setup, and am wondering if maybe one or the other has been set up that way. I don't recall all of the changes that are typically made to adjust for this, but where we usually ride, we don't have to worry much about ever encountering what would qualify as "deep snow". The 99 I purchased used and again know little about it's setup prior to my owning it. The sleds are not stored at home, so I'll need to check on things next time I'm out at storage, if you have questions as to what I've got going on with it currently.

Got any hints, tips, or things to check out, that might help? I'd love to hear them. She gets tired of fighting with the handlebars pretty quickly, and that in turn limits how long I get to ride when we are out together. Thanks!
 

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Loosen the front springs on the front end shocks. Start with very little preload and go from there.
 

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Shim the ski rubbers and make small adjustments to the limiter straps, and try about 3 full turns of preload on the ski shocks.
 

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The gen II chassis is the same as the wedge with the exception of the plastics. And IMO one of the best handling sleds to date for rounding corners like you are on rails.

If you look at the front shock/spring combo in the rear skid, you will notice that there are two mounting locations for the top of the shock. From the factory, my 2000 Triumph was setup so that the shock was in the lower position. I changed it to the upper and noticed a significant improvement. Change to the upper location if it is not already there.

You need to lengthen your limiter straps not shorten them. If your front track shock spring is adjustable, increase the pressure on the spring to help lighten the front end. If worse comes to worse, you can get a stiffer front skid spring to put in there, or a shock with an adjustable collar so you can add more preload to the existing spring.

Get the front end of the sled off the ground, and loosen the ski springs up all the way till they are literally loose, then tighten them back up to add 1/4"-1/2" of preload on the springs. This should get you in the ball park, and I'll bet your wife will be pretty happy.

Then as someone else stated above if you need to, you can add some shims to the ski rubbers.
 

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Loosen up everything. put the rear scissor blocks on low, front blocks on high. Keep all the spring as loose as possible while maintaining pressure on the spring keepers. You may even go to a lighter rear spring. I know I put the next lower poundage springs on my 98. Made it ride alot better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the ideas, everyone. Next time I get a chance to get out there, I will check into the current setup and maybe try a few of these to see if I can get it feeling better. I really appreciate the input!
 

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As mentioned above, loosen all springs to their softest settings. I've found that positioning the front track shock in the lower mounting hole on the torque arm works much better IMO. Better handling, smoother ride, better track attack angle, better weight transfer from rear to front, are a few of the benefits.
 

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how big of carbides does it have?

if the sled is in the air do the skis still turn hard?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
madcow said:
how big of carbides does it have?

if the sled is in the air do the skis still turn hard?
It currently has some worn out 6" carbides. Running 120 studs, which is kind of agggressive. My 700 has the same 6" carbides, though.

But the steering is easy and smooth when the front end is elevated in the air like you mention. It 'feels' like the front end is heavy when riding the machine. But it does not feel like anything mechanical is hindering the movement of the bars or skis if it's stationary.
 

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make one change at a time.
if you loosened up the limiter straps then you should remove or move the rrssblocks back.
 
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