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I'm about to install a new track on a 1996 Arctic Cat Z 440. I have a pretty good idea what I'll be doing, but I wanna make sure. If anyone knows the procedure step-by-step, and wouldn't mind typing it all out that'd be great.[8D]
 

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mxz dude .. try this out ... it should be relatively close to what you need

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Track removal:
I did most of this work with each of the front skis on a milk crate and the rear grab bar on a larger milk crate, turned on end, to raise the track right off the ground. First time I ever had to do it. I couldn't find any instructions on the web either. I've just owned a skidoo a couple of years but I am mechanically inclined. I've worked on motorcycles for 20, and my truck for a couple of years. This machine is a long track but the basic method should hold true for regular length tracks as well as other types of machines. Check all the bearings and idler wheels you have for excess play. Replace now while your have it apart.

Remove the two 13mm (one on each side) upper middle idler shaft bolts.
Remove the two 13mm (one on each side) rear undercarriage bolts.
Remove the two 13mm (one on each side) front undercarriage bolts. These are under tension so they will cock sideways just before they completely come out. This didn't damage the threads, they just have to be completely unscrewed before they are free.
Drag undercarriage out.

Remove exhust pipe for access to Right Hand side sprocket shaft cover.
Remove three 10mm bolts to RH sprocket shaft cover.
Remove RH sprocket shaft-cover but temporarily hang shaft and bearing over sheet metal of chassis.
Release the drive belt tensioner. This is just a rod with a rubber stop and a clip that can be released by hand. It is there to allow the drive belt to be changed without tools.
Take the drive belt off.
Remove four 10mm bolts from chaincase cover (oil will spill so be prepared).
Remove the four 13mm bolts that hold the chaincase to the chassis.
Remove circlip from sprocket shaft gear.

This is the tricky part:
Gently pry chaincase away from chassis with prybar or large screwdriver. This can be difficult because the sprocket shaft bearing and oil seal have to come out of the case and they may not want to let go right away. The gear also has to come off the end of the sprocket shaft at the same time. The other end of the sprocket shaft will be hooked on the sheet metal of the chassis so that should hold the shaft as you gently pry against it.
Take the shaft out by pushing it through the hole in the RH side of the chassis, past where it normally sits. This will allow the gear end of the shaft to clear theL H hole and come out. Once the LH side is free the RH side can be taken back out.
The track should now be free.

Track installation:
Be aware that the new track may be directional. That it may be meant to run a specific direction on the machine. Closely examine the track to see if it is meant to run one way or the other. The rubber cleats on this track were wedge shaped and would not hook up very good at all if run in the reverse direction.

Throw the new track under the machine.
Here is tricky part II:
Work the sprocket shaft into position under the machine and in the track.
Don't forget to hang the RH sprocket cover retaining ring loosely over the shaft.
Put the RH side bearing through the hole in the chassis, past where it normally sits so the other end can be lifted up and placed in its hole. This is basically a reverse of the removal.
Loosely bolt the chaincase back on to the chassis. The sprocket gear will have to be put back on the shaft at the same time the bearing goes in the case. Take up all the play of the chaincase bolts but do not tighten anything yet.
Put the cup of the RH sprocket shaft cover over the bearing.
The sprocket shaft bearing should now push back into the chaincase and the gear fully back on the shaft easily. If it doesn't, something is not aligned properly and should be reexamined.
Bolt the retainer ring to the RH sprocket cover with the three 10mm bolts and tighten.
Tighten the four chaincase bolts.
Reach under machine and fit sprocket shaft oil seal back into the chaincase.
Put circlip back on sprocket gear.
Put cover back on the chaincase and fill it with fresh oil.

And tricky part III, the undercarriage:Because the springs in the under carriage were under tension when they were removed they will not go back into postion unless you do the following.

Place the rear of the machine on a block of wood like a 4x4.Take one of the skis off its' milk crate and place it on the ground.Lift the side of the machine that is still on the other milk crate and lean the machine over. Balance it there and place a milk crate below the handle bar end that is headed for the ground so the machine isn't totally on its side.The rear of the machine should still be on a 4x4.

Open up the track so the undercarriage can be placed inside.The front of the undercarrige must be bolted on first because it springs will be under tension. To put the front two bolts of the undercarriage in, the back end of the track and the under carriage must be angled away from the machine. I had it at about a 45-degree angle. This is why the machine has to be on its side; if it wasn't, the rear of the machine would have to be about four or five feet in the air. When the front two bolts of the undercarriageare in, the machine can be set back upright on the ground so the weight of the machine can compress the springs.

Loosen the track adjusting bolts on the end of the undercarriage to make it as loose as possible. Pull back on the track and undercarriage and put in the two rear bolts. This may take some effort. Bolt the middle set of ilder wheels back in the tunnel.

Finishing touches:
Adjust track tightness. The front limit strap may also be adjusted. Letting the front of the track extend more will allow the rear adjusters to extend less, but may take weight off the skis making turning more difficult. Spring preload is also adustable on this machine and probably most others. More spring preload will make the machine ride higher and able to carry more weight before the rear sags. Downside is a slightly rougher ride and harder turning because of less weight on the skis and a higher center of gravity.
 

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to sum up what Tundra said:

prop up rear of sled and remove skid, 4 bolts that are pretty easy to find.

use some kind of suction device to suck oil outa chain case, or let it spill, there are a few bolts holding it on. now u will see all the gears, look for bolts n nuts to get the chain off, and remeber where all the washers and such go. (im not sure on this, but tehre should be a bearing holder that will have 3 bolts or nuts that u need to remove on the chain case side)

there is a bearing holder to be removed on the clutch side also, remove the nuts and bolts

by this time the shaft should pretty much be ready to fall out if all the stuff in the chain case has been removed from it, simply push the shaft towards the clutch side of the machine and it will come out of the chain case and then it is out.

now your ready to put the new track on and put it all back together


as long as you are somewhat mechanically inclined, it is a pretty easy job, just do not forget how the chaincase goes together if you forget a washer or put it in the wrong spot, ur chain will be gone very fast. i have some pics of my sled tore apart when i had all that stuff removed that might help, let me know if u want them
 

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I usually lift the back 4' into the air. I also loosen the rear axle and adjusters as the first step.
I never lay the machine on its side. I always get the front skid shaft on first and then put something on the floor under the track about 1/3 of the way back. Then I slowly lower the back until the rear skid shaft lines up. I've used tie-downs or a comealong hung from the rafters. I prefer tie downs. I've also used an engine crane but not many people have an engine crane in there garage.
 

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okay, okay ... you caught me ... i do my work outdoors in any weather and my sky hooks done broke on me so i use the side method .... had i a rafter tho i would certainly use that (probably still with the sky hook) ... :)
 

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ps ... OOPS >...... that first post of mine is actually a cut and paste jobby from a post that i came accross a few months ago ... you guys on here really know your stuff so i keep quite a bit for future reference.

my apologies to the original poster
 

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Just a note, try using a tie down or rope and compress and secure the chassis in a squished condition) before you remove any bolts whatsoever. This will make removal and installation very easy as you will have much room to work, also I use a jack under the front of the track when installing to line up the front suspension bolts,(works very well)

Food for Thought
 
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