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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
/snofan/../images/users/Dooer/piggybagdampare.jpg
what do you think about this?[:0][?][?]
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
nonono, no, i mean that spring:D can u see how it is positioned? !! look closer !!
 

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less shock movement....but more force. There doesn't seem to be an advantage to something like that
 

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Lynx is Bombardier's european division.. here's more pics.. of the Ranger Mountain.. that's where that suspension pic is from.. I have no idea why the shock is like that either..? anyone..?




http://www.bombardier.fi/lynx/en/2003/deep/rangermountain800.php
 

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it is because they dont use Radius Rods. So when those sleds hit a bump, the camber angle as well as the caster angle will change. As with the traditional trailing arm setup we are used to, we use thin radius rods there which would never be able to hold up to having a spring mounted there. Also this seems to be a long track version, so maybe this style isnt really setup for moguls or trails, its setup for the steep and deep. I would imagine this style would also save quite a bit of weight. Just my 2 cents worth....anyone else have any ideas???
 

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All lynx front suspension look like this, why i dont know as i never tried one. But they say it's a very good suspension. if you pop the hood you can see that the shocks also has a rod between them to stiffen them.also the sled in the track is different,and is a construction by lynx. There are much moore lynx in those sleds than meet the eye....
 

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maybe it a better set up for mountain/deep snow??? also looks like they could be bolted in outer location too.
 

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It looks like it keeps the shock out of the deep snow to me, maybe giving less drag when sidehilling or turning in the deep.

-It has less parts. that's good
-It will ride like a Ford truck with "twin I-beam" front suspension. that's bad.
-Bottom arm has to be built very heavy, as it is now acting as a beam. that's bad

that's all from my corner of the world.

Later,
Pneuman
 

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I take that back. There's a tie-rod on the top of the spindle. This sled should handle very much like any other trailing arm machine with radius rods. If Doo has done their homework, camber shouldn't be *too* vairable through the full sweep of the suspension.

It's an interesting design. One thing that comes to mind is a less than ideal introduction of forces from the top of the shock towers into the sled's frame. The force vectors point straight up, well in front of the sled's CG. By comparison, an IFS or DSA front end angles the shocks inward, toward the sleds CG (well, moreso.) this results in less affect to the whole chassis when hitting a bump. This weird design may feel like it's porpoising more than a conventional sled.

later guys
Pneuman
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
"
Technology based on our experiences from the extreme conditions on the race tracks. Extra long vertical travel and optimal geometry. " ..says lynx
 

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Reminds me of the old twin shock motocross bikes of the late 70's early 80's, the idea is if you mount the shock at a mid-point of the swingarm, a shorter stroke of the shock will still give the same or greater amount of travel at the end of the swingarm depending on the geometry of the shock and the swingarm. What's old is new again.
 

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I'd hate to be ditch banging with that. As we all know, one poorly positioned stump will take out your lower radius rod. Here it looks as if it would take out one whole side of the sled, and be a tough ride home.
 

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I understand the suspension system now, but the only difference between that and what polaris is currently using with their trailing arm setup is that the shock has a different mounting location. Its really quite surprising that since Lynx and ski-doo are practically the same company that the REV chassis or at least the REV front suspension have not found their way into the Lynx lineup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Originally posted by TriumphoverU
[br]I understand the suspension system now, but the only difference between that and what polaris is currently using with their trailing arm setup is that the shock has a different mounting location. Its really quite surprising that since Lynx and ski-doo are practically the same company that the REV chassis or at least the REV front suspension have not found their way into the Lynx lineup.
no, revs wont found their way into the lynx lineup.. lynx is lynx! its not same as ski-doo! lynx has its own patented suspensions and so on.. since im very big lynx fan i hate when people thinks that ski-doo is practically same company as lynx[:(!]
lynx is not "owned" by skidoo..
 

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Bombardier owns Lynx, Bombardier ownes Ski-Doo. I would really love to see that rear suspension up close and personal, Other then that looks to be a ZX platform, but really great graphics.[8D]
 

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Bombardier owns Lynx and Ski-Doo which makes them both owned by the same company which means Lynx could have a REV chassis without any troubles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
yes.. but it doesnt mean that lynx is same as skidoo.. sure lynx could have rev platform,but ive read that lynx isn't going to use rev. instead it is developing same kind of chassis as rev. im pretty sure that it will have same hood and other cosmetic parts, but i dont think lynx is going to use rev...

i dont know, what about those patented parts? what IF skidoo would use lynxes front susp. and stuff?
tell me if im wrong..
 
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