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Well first off im from MN. A couple of friends that i usaualy go on trips with want to go to colorado in a couple of weeks 1st week in january or so. My question is whats necessary for safe riding? We plan on mainly trail riding (121 tracks, we might put on 136's with 1.5) and play in some powder. Will we be able to play in the powder? Another huge concern is avalanches and safety precautions. Is it the best idea to hire a guide if we wanna play in the pow or is it relatively safe in lower elevations? Thanks
 

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If you are gonna be trail riding and just messing around a little bit off trail I would not worry to much about avalanches although it is a possibility anywhere. You will probably want a shovel more so to make your stuck life better.

DW
 

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you will beable to play in some powder just fine. be carful and remember how you got where you were when you are exploring. as far as avalanches dont worry you will not beable to get where you have to worry to much. Bring a GPS and bottled water and maby some snickers. Do not get dehidrated and remember rest if needed it gets hard to breath when you are working hard. Dont try to climb to big of mountian they dont look as big as they are. You will be fine just stay togather and do not get to far off the trail untill you are familliar. Have fun and explore. If you are going for mainly Trail riding I sigguest the snowies down by Laramie WY thay have a very large trail system and groome it very well you can also get out and play. Good luck
 

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Not to get off subject where are you heading DAN in WY on the 25th i am leaving the 26th for the Northern big horns.
 

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If your heading to the hills be prepared.
You may not get in the avalanche area, but there is a good chance you will.
Transceivers, shovels, probes and a basic avalanche course is a must, the equipment is costly but you should be able to find a place that rents them.
A gps would be ideal
Food, you are out all day, have lunch and snacks, plenty of water also.
Depending on snow conditions you could find yourself above the tree line and avalanche shoots which is always a higher risk for slides.
My first so called mountain sled only had a 121 and I got into some hellish areas with it, mind you it also had 2" plastic paddles on it (wo wo, old school)
 

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yeah Team is right
transievers are a must...
and a 136 track will take you a lot of places and get you through some deep pow(just dont start climbing with it)
 

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Originally posted by larsenracing
[br]Not to get off subject where are you heading DAN in WY on the 25th i am leaving the 26th for the Northern big horns.
I will be staying at Bear Lodge!! Be there on the morning of the 26th and hopeing to ride with WY rider for a couple days depending on what goes down with him.

Were you staying?

DW
 

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SF GROUP RIDE AT THE NORTHERN BIGHORNS 26TH TO THE 30TH!!!! Breakfast at 7:30 at the moose crossing restaurant in Bear lodge. lol
 

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This is kinda funny how we are all gonna be there at the same time!!! I am not sure how early you are gonna be getting me up either 7:30 on vacation might be kinda hard!!!

DW
 

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i'll bring the ultra, that will wake you up. Im not sure how much the other vacationers would feel about that though. lol I think it would be a cool idea to have a Mountain sf ride. Its been talked about but never done I think. Ill see if Happyfast will come. and I got another buddy that has a 990 bb king cat, it might be to early for him though. hes not a big fan of driving his sled before JAN.
 

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Im not exactly sure where we are staying because my dad set up the ladging but that is where we usually stay. If you see us stop I ride the seld pictured to the left and my dad rides a 05 700 RMK 144" and my bro has a 04 Ski-doo and other brother has a 99 blue 700 RMK 136" we also may have a buddy with a 98 800 skidoo 136" summet with. you will probably find me jumpint off cornuses or something stupid. I hope to see you out there.

PS> lets move this to a new thread instead of hyjaking this thread. Ill start it.
http://www.snowmobilefanatics.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=59306
 

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Originally posted by TeamNFG
[br]If your heading to the hills be prepared.
You may not get in the avalanche area, but there is a good chance you will.
Transceivers, shovels, probes and a basic avalanche course is a must, the equipment is costly but you should be able to find a place that rents them.
A gps would be ideal
Food, you are out all day, have lunch and snacks, plenty of water also.
Depending on snow conditions you could find yourself above the tree line and avalanche shoots which is always a higher risk for slides.
My first so called mountain sled only had a 121 and I got into some hellish areas with it, mind you it also had 2" plastic paddles on it (wo wo, old school)
I'm glad to see the right answer here.
Remember that most avalanches happen on slopes in the 30 degree range and that's not nearly as steep as one might think when looking at avalanche conditions.

Bring a Snow Bunje too if you have one.
I do get stuck in some weird places as I am a mountain rider
and they are really handy for getting going again fast.
You definately want that shovel on your pack and not the sled.
It really sucks to have to dig your shovel out. Sort of defeates the purpose.

Be prepared to work your ass off when mountain riding, so dress in layers to be able to shed some.
I wear fleece pants, moto cross jersey, moto cross sox, and Klim shell and bibs, thin snowmobile gloves, moto cross helmet, and 2 payne goggles. That's it

Bring everything NFG said, and maps too if available.
Remember when boondocking (exploring off trail), if you do get lost,
First RELAX and don't panic. Drink a little water and wait a minute if you have to.
Just find your tracks and follow them back to the trail.

If you dropped down a hill and can't make it back up to the trail,
Take turns banging at it going up the same track and packing it down till you can make it back up. You will basically pave your self a road.
We've all (mountain riders) been there and it's just a part of it.

Enjoy and let us know how it went.
 

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Basicaly everything has been said that you should do,but one thing is that you need to trust yourself not to do anything stupid, like jumping off a 20 ft cornice. Dont be trying anything new in respect to pushing your limits, because mountains arent the place to do it. Hope you have fun because there realy is no better place to sled!!
 

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One thing to keep in mind as your "exploring" off trail. is leave the trail
and go to the uphill side of the trail, cause you can always(mostly) come back down to the
trail... if you leave the trail and go downhill... there may be no getting back.
 

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Originally posted by Student Driver


If you dropped down a hill and can't make it back up to the trail,
Take turns banging at it going up the same track and packing it down till you can make it back up. You will basically pave your self a road.
We've all (mountain riders) been there and it's just a part of it.
The 'ol Vector did that this weekend. Probably a combination of me getting extremely tired. Getting stuck, then rolling the Vector on it's side while sidehilling and hitting a hard spot in the snow, then getting stuck at the bottom turning around and getting stuck again trying to get back up. Everyone was paving the trail for me.
 

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Ya ACG,

It is a little scary the first couple times you find your self in that situation.
It is part of learning mountain riding though and it does get easier.
Glad your friends knew what to do.

When I was learning, my friends made me bang and bang at the hills til I got my self out.
End of the day, I'd be so worked I could barely drive home.
It was very hard, but I learned very fast.
 

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I think ACG And SD just said exactly what's going to happen on your first mtn. trip. Everything is different than in the flats including the amount of energy it seems that you exert once you are stuck. If you don't get stuck while out there you aren't having fun. My first trip was with some guys that had ridden the same area for 10+ trips. I learned the exact way SD did, they kept on pushing me to continue to work up the steep stuff until I had the skill and guts to do it on my own.
 

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Don't rip this post up, it's something I type up a long time ago for first time riders... but I am sure they will find something useful in it. Also below is what I pack while riding-

(good luck with the short tracks ;)

Snowmobiling 101
Golden Rules

Never hit a fixed object- the breaks are awesome, use them!!
Never hit an on coming snowmobile, stay to the right!!
Never run on the very side of a groomed trail- they groom over the edge- no recovery
Never stand on the trail when parked, stand between them or on a side
Never park or get off the sled unless it’s flat- up hill, down hill or sideways
If you don’t want to do something don’t, unless ordered to, lol

Run Down

Find a parking spot
Put normal coat on
Lower the front ramps
Take the covers off the sleds, put them in the truck
Lift the rear of the sleds and slam them down, then start the sleds
Remove the tie downs, place them in the back of the truck
Drive the sleds off near the truck, by the back doors
Put on your winter gear, or place them on the sled
Shut the sleds off, they should be warmed up enough
Fill the sled with gas, oil, plugs, belts, and their rack bag w/goods
Place front ramp up, lock tailgate and topper, and doors
Doesn’t hurt to take pictures of other trucks license plates
Before you head out, tell someone where you’re riding, or leave a note in the truck of the plan

Operation

There is no key, lift the red emergency kill switch and pull start (no need to give gas)
Never use the break and gas at the same time, do this it’s $55.00 bucks in 30sec
Never have the brake lock on and try to drive away, do this it’s $55.00 bucks in 30sec
Never move the sled with out grabbing the brake once
Don’t ride hard until the sled is warmed up
If you’re not moving, or not going to, shut it off
Always use premium 92% octane gas
Always use Arctic Cat APV oil- oil and gas don’t mix even though it’s a 2 stroke
The engine coolant is only cooled when it’s moving over snow

Trail Riding

Don’t ride the edge of the trail, stay to the right
Up hill people should have right-away
If the trail is hard packed, try to dip off into the powered to cool it
Never turn off the trail or go some where else until the person behind you sees you do it
If in a group hold your fingers up to state how many people are behind you, for on coming traffic. A fist means, last person.

Powered Riding

Always look far a head for small bumps, dips and long running ditches, and fences
Yes standing/kneeling is a good idea for movement and visibility
Watch the person in front of you for foot and body placement

Riding Tips

Stuck- take off your coat or unzip it, don’t sweat in your gear
Pull the front and have someone give some gas, don’t be sitting on it!
Don’t dig the tunnel out, pull it up and over if you in a hole
If in the white stuff, add on the power if you think you need it ahead of time
Steer by standing on one side/pulling the handle bars and leaning
Sometimes leave a small gap in the visor of your helmet for ventilation if your fogging up
Always remain high side on the sled when (the side that faces the top of the mountain)
Terms:
Side hilling, moving along the edge
High marking, seeing how high you can go straight up and back down
Tight turns, step and pull on the inside, the way you want to turn
Boon docking- ridding off the trail

Live Saving Ideas

Don’t sit at the bottom of a hill when people are high marking
Don’t run down a hill to out run an avalanche, go off to the side
If you are lost, stay on the trail at the last place you were with someone
Never try to stop a sled from rolling
Never high mark above some one and stop to help a friend, walk it
Never go out alone
If stuck/broken sled, walk out only on trail before spending the night
Never leave someone behind, stay with them or take them with you
If new, be loaded up before dark
Play on the way in, drive straight out when below half, at last before 25% empty
Always take off wet stuff
Don’t use your sled to get someone else’s sled unstuck
Don’t depend on snowmobile tracks to get out of the woods

Rack Bag

1 pair of extra gloves

1 Beanie

1 Water bottle

1 Thermos of a hot drink

1 PVC tube that hold lunch, sub sandwiches

3 Candy or nutrition bars

1 National Geographic plastic/GPS map

1 Compass

3 Reusable instant heat packs

1 Needle-node pliers

1 Heavy duty pliers

1 TP in a freezer bag

20 Zip Ties

Survival Kit-Rubber made container to fit in the rack bag-duck taped closed

7 packs of cotton balls with Vaseline

2 pack of water proof matches

1 Double sided knife with serrated base

1 Flash light self energy generating

4 Flairs/with smoke

1 Metal tin cup with cap

1 Leatherman

1 Survival Mirror with hole (reflection)

1 Leather belt with meal buckle

1 Balling wire

1 Backup compass

3 Health bars

12 Safety pins

12 Black Trash Bags with plastic ties

20 Zip Ties



Under the hood

4 New spark plugs

1 Extra belt

2 Screw drivers (factory tool kit)

2 wrenches (factory took kit)



Under the Seat

Shovel

4X4 Tow strap

Gas line hose

2 Bungee cords

1 Pair of Mittens

Personally kept on me-Camera, MP3 Player, extra batteries, cell phone, camel pack, sometimes GSP unit and avalanche beacon. Keeping these items one me, keeps the batteries warm so they last longer.
 
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