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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, this is probably stupid, but can't find a diagram in brown's leisure or anyting google searching.

Had some snow so took my newly acquired 98 ZR500 out for a few laps. Hit 50 and at about 7000-8000 rpm's...does this seem right? (Don't believe a snowmobile shifts down like a car...right)

Also, at times steering seems to be "off"...skiis straight but steering a bit to left. Looking at steering assembly under hood, rod goes to front and only 1 connector to the right side/ski from it...should there be one to the left side also? Included best pic I had....can see the bar coming up from steering assembly...

Sorry for not knowing what things are called and if these questions are stupid...just learning.

Thanks!
[attachment=41051]
 

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Here is a diagram of the steering post assembly for your sled.


Assuming the your skis are aligned properly, part #22 is what you use to align the handlebars. There is only 1 tie rod from the steering post to the steering assembly.

As for the RPM issue, You are right that the RPM's won't drop as you accelerate since the drive clutch is closing and the driven clutch is opening, in effect changing the gearing speeding you up. I'm not sure what peak RPM's are for that motor, but I'm guessing that if you had more room to go faster, the RPM's would go a bit higher before leveling off.
 

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I think this is the pic you want to see


If both your skis turn when you turn the handle bars you are connected ok. Your skis are probably just out of alignment. To align you need unscrew nut on each side of steering tube no#13 and 15 and turn #14 to turn ski which way you need it. You should get a manual. it will tell you the whole process to line skis up to the track. About your revs. I think it sounds like you have clutch issues your sled should be faster at those rpms.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The skis do turn and stuff...doesn't seem lose, but when riding seem to get a bit off. Will check and make sure everything seems tight and stuff.

I do know that the person I got the sled from said the clutch was a "softer" clutch...gave me the original one also. Could this be why it seems a bit slower at the rpm's? I have the original one...if I pick up a clymers or shop manual...is it something I could do myself, putting it back in? (Never done it, but not totally inept) Otherwise maybe I will check about getting it in and maybe getting it replaced.

Know it has a ton more zip than the 93 polaris classic i have (500 touring)....looking forward to the extra zip!

Thanks for the info!
 

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7000 RPM would be normal under acceleration, but if you are just cruising, then thats a little high. If the clutch is set soft is gonna throw itself back when you accelerate, and go high RPM. you shoudl be running top end about 95 MPH at 8700 RPM, butif you are accelerating, you can get almost any rpm across the board. You want the clutches to lock up and get as close to 50:50 when you are running at a constant speed, when you accelearate, the front clutch goes skinny, and the back opens up until you start going fast, then it slims down and the ratio is evened out.
 

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ZR engines were clutched "hard" from the factory. That means that they don't engage at low RPM; you have to spin 'em pretty fast to engage (like 4500 rpm.) That can be VERY annoying when you are just cruising trails, but is necessary if you are racing to allow the engine to get into some of it's torque band (two strokes dont' make much torque at low RPM.)

The person you got the sled from probably decided he would rather have a smoother engagement for the type of riding he was doing and changed things (all that needs changing are the weights and springs).

Can you change it back? Absolutely, it's something you need to know how to do if you like toying with the mechanics at all. The Clymer's manual is a good place to start; it explains pretty well how clutches work and what different spring rates and heavier or lighter flyweights will do for your performance.

Getting the clutch off the sled requires a puller specific to that clutch, changing weights and springs does not require removal of the clutch. It is easier to do on the bench, and while it's off, it's nice to give it a thorough cleaning; belt dust will cause binding and loss of performance.

Good luck and have fun!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks all...knew I could get some good info from all of you. Gonna take my sleds down to folks house as I do not have a garage to work on them and need to clean up and make sure the chain case is okay in the polaris...will tinker with the AC also based on what you gave me.

Thanks again! Love this site!
 
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