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Hi,
This will be my second year sledding. I got my son and myself each a sled when he turned 17 to get us back to doing things together. My sled is really probably bigger than I should have started on (I believe it's a 98 Ski Doo MXZ 670 (VIN 1254 03273) (MNFR DATE FEB 1997) I've gotten thrown pretty far a couple times (30+ feet the first time/my fault) Anyway, I'm looking forward to learning more about becoming a better and safer rider and owner. Thanks in advance for any tips and tricks you guys send my way.
 

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Welcome to the forum, I wouldn't say there is any good sled or bad sled to start on its just knowing and learning your limits for said sled and as you ride more you'll feel more comfortable on it. My first sled was a 440 Jag but that was only probably for 6 laps around the pasture then we brought home an EXT580 and for whatever stinking reason I loved the tank (literally it was a tank) not sure how my skinny little 12year old 140lb but dug that out but I sure got it stuck a lot haha

not sure if you ride motorcycle or jet ski but the idea it similar to appoint you have lean with the vehicle when riding in deeper snow or cornering at a higher speed, biggest thing I can emphasize is know where your riding and what your riding on, ditch biggest thing is watch out for culverts on approaches I know ive hooked a few skis, otherwise fields woods and stuff rocks stumps shrubs ect can all provide very sudden stop

I don't know anything about Skidoos so cant help ya much there, just the typical if your going to any big altitude changes make sure its jetted properly and I always run the next weight down in my clutches, I like that little extra pull :icon_smilie_1_lol:
 

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DC, welcome to the site. It is great to see new folks coming to the sport. It is very fun, can be frustrating and is waaay expensive. That being said, I wish you and your son many years of safe and happy riding. dt2 said it pretty well.....learn and know the limits of you and your equipment. Sleds do not stop but they tend to go like hell on ground that is false in a way, meaning you have no idea what is below for the most part. Ice, rocks, stumps, culverts, cars and other sleds come out of nowhere. There are safety courses offered by local clubs that I would highly suggest you forfeit a day and sit in on....both of you. Usually it will give you a discount on insurance and there are a few other perks along with a day full of information if nothing else. Best of luck and stay safe.
 
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