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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am the new owner of a 1996 Polaris Storm. It has the Xtra 10 rear suspension on it, it has 4200 miles. Nothing in the rear end (?? is that the term, I'm a car guy to :) has been changed, but maintained well. It seems weak to me though. When I have it on level ground and pick up the back to fully extend the rear, I then let it go and it will settle half way down on its own, then if I push a little on the rear or sit on it, the suspension will collapse to the stops. Is this normal? If not, what do I need to replace? Shocks? Which one? Springs? Are these hard to replace? Thanks. [:D]

Ray
 

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Welcome to the bb. The xtra-10 has torsion springs. they are the springs wrapped around the top skid frame mounting bolt and they have an arm which goes diagonally from up top to down rear. They manage the static height and drop of the rear skid. there's a coil spring wrapped around one of the rear shocks. If you weigh enough and the torsion spring adjuster, plastic do-hicky up near the to of the spring, is turned to the low setting (long end parallel to spring) try turning the plastic dohickey so the long end is perpendicular to the spring arm. That will stiffen the rear. After that you might want to replace that spring with a new stiffer one. You can replace all the springs and the shocks and be good as new. Or try one thing at a time and see what happens. When you sit on the machine it should drop maybe 3 inches from static. If it bottoms and the torsion spring is at full stiff, you probably need a set on new ones.
 

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I don't believe you should be able to push the suspension all the way down to the stops. The usual way of checking the ride-in height of the sled is to measure up to the back bumper with no rider on the sled. Then sit on the sled (with your gear on) and recheck the height. For the Xtra-10, I believe is should only be two inches different. You used to be able to go to the polaris website and actually download the suspension setup instructions (www.polarisindustries.com).
I don't know what kind of shocks came with that model sled, but if they are rebuildable, they certainly need rebuilding by now. The absolute best thing to do is remove the rear suspension from the sled, and go through it thoroughly. You would be susprised how few people know what grease is for. While you are checking your spindles for lubrication, check all the bogie wheels to be sure the bearings are ok. Check the sliders to see what condition they are in, now is the time to replace them if they need it. In 99, the Xtra-10 had a Fox PPS shock put on the rear, this is the best single thing you can do for your ride (www.off-road.com/snowmobile/project/pps/pps.html).

There is a lot of info on these forums, do a search for Xtra-10 to familiarize yourself with the rear skid. Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the info guys. I got bored last night and removed the rear. The shock seems ok...I can compress it with two hands, but that may be normal. The rest of the rear end is in good shape. What is the life expectancy of a Fox Shock? Are these rebuildable? Or am I better off just replacing it? The shock does not play a role in ride height correct? What the P/N for that PPS shock?
Ok now for the big discovery...the torsion springs seem week. I am able to "unlatch" them from the bottom wheel. Anyone have a part number for these? Are these common problems and need replacing at the mileage I have on the sled? Sorry for all the questions...I am new to this and have nothing to compare this to.

Ray
 

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If the fox shocks have a little inlet on the bottom, looks like you can stick a needle in it, then they are rebuildable. If this is the case you are better off having them recharged vs. buying new shocks. Rebuild will cost you 25-35 a shock. I rebuild my shocks pretty much every year.

As for the springs you should be able to undo them from the bottom of the skid, but it should take a little muscle. If they have never been replaced i would replace them since they would have 4200m on them.

Since you have the skid out, grease, grease, grease. Check that there is no side to side play in any of the wheels, if there is replace. Check that they all spin smoothly. Check the HYFAX (the plastic runners on the bottom of the rails). Tighten all the bolts. Then you get to go through the fun of putting the skid back in... Welcome to the forum and the wonderful world of snowmobiles.
 

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There is a conversion kit for the PPS shock($210). Not sure if it will work in your sled or not but look here and call or email them. Near bottom of page.

http://www.mcbperformance.com/skis_trk.html#fox
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
OK...so I ordered a new set of torsion springs. I had three choices: standard, medium, or heavy duty. I ordered the medium seeing I will ride two up often. I brought the rear shock in for a recharge seeing it has a screw at the bottom. Should I worry about the front shock on the skid? It seems to play a lesser role, am I correct?

Thanks,
Ray
 

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The front shock in the track is just as important. It takes the initial impact of a bump. The force is transferred/shared with the rear shock after a certain amount of force. This is called coupling. If the shock is worn out the coupling will not happen as well as it would with two good shocks. In turn affecting how well the sled handles bumps etc...

The front shock in the track also affects the amount of ski pressure. If the shock is worn there is more force placed on the skis which will affect how well the front end handles. This is a basic explaination and i'm sure someone else will have more of the physics info.
 
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