Snowmobile Fanatics banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello, Im new to all things with sleds. Could someone please tell me how the drivetrain works? What makes the track spin and stay put on the sliders? I may be pickin up a friends sled for free ( Bonus! ) but its in pieces. Thanx!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,617 Posts
Welcome to The ULTIMATE Snowmobile Forum and to snowmobiling in general.

The basic breakdown of the drive train is that there is a clutch on the crankshaft of the engine called the primary clutch (or drive clutch). There is another clutch on the jackshaft (secondary clutch or driven clutch). There is a drive belt linking the two and as you speed up the engine the primary clutch squeezes together and pushes on the belt spinning the drive and driven clutches. The driven clutch spins the jackshaft which is connected to a chaincase that has gears and a chain in it. The top gear is on the jackshaft and the bottom gear is on the driveshaft that drives the drivers of the track, restulting in a spinning track.

This is basically how it works and if anyone wants to fix anything that I may have not said to clearly go ahead but this is basically how it works
 
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
What makes your track spin?

LOL Squeeze the little lever under your thumb!!!!

Welcome to the club!!!

Dennis
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Yeah, cut me some slack![:)] I have no track for project "No-Name-Beat-Ass-Sled" and was wondering if a track has groves or teeth down the middle, Or do large rubber wheels drive the track. I also had a crazy winter idea. Thanx, Max
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,617 Posts
The track is driven by drivers that hook up to knobs on the back of the track like what is shown in the picture.

/polarisman/../images/users/Bigwilly/hifax.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
331 Posts
Originally posted by MadMax
[br]Hello, Im new to all things with sleds. Could someone please tell me how the drivetrain works? What makes the track spin and stay put on the sliders? I may be pickin up a friends sled for free ( Bonus! ) but its in pieces. Thanx!
and to further expand on what BigWilly said (if I may) is that those Lugs that he pointed out are usually on the outside AND inside of the 'sliders' (that is the white substance shown in his photo), and they keep the track from falling off or sliding off to one side (provided that the track is tensioned properly)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
That makes sense, can I cut a track to a smaller size? Ive seen "Chetah" tracks that were all sectional. but the new ones are all solid, I guess?....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
331 Posts
Welcome to the Ultimate Forum MadMax.....
I myself haven't seen any sectional tracks on a sled, they MAY have made them in the past.
So are you talking about the kind of tracks that are on like a catepillar or something like that? (except rubber instead of steel)
I HAVE seen cleated tracks, but I don't think they were sectional ones, they just had cleats installed on them and they may have LOOKED sectional....
in answering your question though, unless there are products out there that will allow you to 'splice' your track back together, I am pretty sure that you have to buy a track that is the correct size, both length and width for your suspension geometry and sled. (I DO know there is a company out there that will splice damaged tracks) So, if your sled originally calls for a 133X15X1.5 track, there will be SOME adjustment, but for the most part, it will have to be that size unless you do some modifications to your sled such as moving the suspension attachment points....btw, the 133 is how LONG the track is, the 15 is how wide and the 1.5 is the lug height (in the above example) hopefully this answers a few of your questions and not make more...LOL...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
What sled do you have? Year, Make, Model? That will help answer some of the questions you are asking. Everything is fixable if you know what you are working with.[:I]
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top