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XLTMan,
On the 8's versus 9's question. I had a friend of mine who used to race sno-cross and has worked on sleds a lot tell me that you should use the 9's when it's cold out and the temperature is close to what the jetting chart shows you are jetted for. If the temp goes up in the 30's and 40's and you need to have a hotter plug to burn off some extra oil then throw in the 8's.

It seemed to make good sense to me.
 

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Well I was thinking of switching to the 8's and a good friend of mine that has worked on sleds for over 20 years told me not to. He says if you have to switch to a hotter plug, you are covering up a carb/fuel problem.
 

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Unless your sled is heavily modified always stick with the recommended plug from factory. That is what it is designed to take.
 

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Bottom line is if your sled recommends the champs and you have always used ngk's give the champs a try. I have tried ngk 9es and 8es along with champ rn2c in my 650(it recommends rn2c's) The 9es does not seem to burn hot enough plug checks always look rich and the 9es is the only plug i have fouled. The 8es seems to work well in operation but not piece of mind as they are cross refrenced to the champ rn3c which is a hotter plug than the rn2c. The Rn2c runs like the 8es with the piece of mind of the cooler plug.
As a comparision the 9es with 260 mains plug check black, the champs with the same carb settings plug test tan, with a much smoother top end.
 

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SP stands for special.....but anyways, i bought the xlt sp with ngk in it, i know the book says champ rn2c, but i have had crap luck with champs, maybe it could have been just that set, but it has detured me ever since. but maybe i give champ a try, i have never used them in any of my sleds, but i hear the point about the mfg reccomends, i guess who would know best.
 

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Wheelman,

My jetting chart is under the hood on a sticker. If you don't have that I would suggest a service manual or the dealer. I have not seen any jetting charts online yet. As XLTMAN said it stands for special. The special has 38mm carbs and the regular XLT's have 34mm carbs. As far as plugs go the NGK's and Champions are supposed to be directly cross referenced, but it sounds like people have noticed or perceived some differences in how they perform. BTW I was not recommending using the wrong plug (hotter) all the time, just relaying that I have been told it's OK to use a hotter plug to burn off extra oil if the weather is really warm and your on the trail. Of course this would not apply in newer sleds that have EFI and other self adjusting systems. And you would never want to use the hotter plug if you planned on doing WOT runs across the lake all day. My .02
 

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Originally posted by Polaris XLTSP
[br] The special has 38mm carbs and the regular XLT's have 34mm carbs.
This only applies to 96-97 machines.
In 98 the XLT classic and XLT Special had 38mm carbs. The XLT Limited had 34mm carbs.

In 99 The XLT Classic and XLT Special had 38mm carbs.

The biggest diference between the XLT and XLT SP are Fox/Ryde FX shocks in the SP's

93-95 XLT's all had 34mm carbs.
 

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I have no wisdom, just not enough snow here and too much time to look up stuff on the computer!! LOL

Oh, and I should have said in '99 the 38mm carbs were flatslide carbs.
 

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Question on this topic...I have an '02 XC700Sp that calls for Champion RN57YCC. I know CC means dual copper. I tried to order them locally and can only find YC's.
Is there a big difference in performance between C and CC ?.
 

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No....Just a newer version with a newer #. In my book it says to use the yc's.
 

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i always use NGK plugs. i have had too many problems with just about every other plug champions included. i use B8EGV or B9EGV in just about everything i run. if you guys want to pick up some spark energy and possibly some power. switch to a non resistor plug like what i listed above the "R" in all the designations means "Resistor" these reduce spark energy. only use a non resistor plug if you have carbs and no fancy digital CDI's as the non resistor plugs put out more electrical "noise" that can make sensitive electronic malfunction.

the EGV series is a racing plug. i have gone through just two of these in my yz 250 in the whole 5 years since i rebuilt it. i also run 24:1 oil mix in that bike. never missed a beat.

also Honda uses NGK plugs in there GP engines so if they trust them i think i can too.
 

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Originally posted by xcr440
[br]No....Just a newer version with a newer #. In my book it says to use the yc's.
Kinda what I figured.....thanks
 

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My 99 XLT Special calls for Champion N2C plugs, but I was thinking of switching to NGK plugs as I have heard that they are better. The sled currently has NGK BR8ES plugs and they seem to work great, but the cross reference charts say the BR9ES is the correct plug if it calls for Champion N2C plugs. What do you guys recommend, which are better and why?
XLTMan,
On the 8's versus 9's question. I had a friend of mine who used to race sno-cross and has worked on sleds a lot tell me that you should use the 9's when it's cold out and the temperature is close to what the jetting chart shows you are jetted for. If the temp goes up in the 30's and 40's and you need to have a hotter plug to burn off some extra oil then throw in the 8's.

It seemed to make good sense to me.
So I bought NGK BR8ES but before I had BR9ES it seem to work fine but if I don't start it in a week it seem to take a while to start up could that be because there's no fuel in the engine I shut off the fuel valve
 
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