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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all

I was pulling a loaded sleigh with my 88 Tundra and it did not seem to want to move after stopping. I stood up (I weigh 265lbs) and it began moving right along with no problems. It does not sound like I am bottoming out (ie. like the body is acting like a brake on the track) and the slide suspension springs are in the correct position according to the shop manual.

Should I move up my front suspension springs to the next highest adjustment just in case? If I do that, how will that affect my ski tension and how should I adjust my rear springs to compensate? (tighten them up as well?) What else could be the problem? I have a new belt that has no signs of wear. I also have new cam sliders and just adjusted the driven pulley according to the shop manual as well.

Thanks for any help you can provide.
 

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I don't think you can adjust the ski pressure on those, so you're stuck with playing with the suspension adjustments.
On my '87 Tundra, I have the rear springs maxed out, and the front springs at the 3/4 setting (the 3rd highest setting). I weigh 210# & frequently have a bunch of gear on the rack whenever I'm driving it for trailbreaking purposes, so I'd imagine I'd have about 270# on it. It rides pretty rough, but if I don't have it at those settings it bottoms out.
I don't know what caused your Tundra to not want to start moving again like that, except maybe the sled you were pulling froze itself to the trail when you stopped & when you got off it jarred it loose...? Just a stab...
After that incident did the Tundra perform like normal?
 

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Did you have a lot of snow or ice build up between the track and bottom of sled. that will act like a brake also.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hello NightTrain

It may have frozen up, I never thought of that. It was about -33C (-27F) on the way home and I stopped for a few minutes to retie my load that I had on the sleigh. After it started moving again it ran fine all the way home and the last hill (kinda steep) was no problem whatsoever to climb.

My front spring is only at the 1/2 setting and I was thinking that I would try and move it up ... after hearing of your settings, I definately will as I now know that it will not cost me on ski pressure.

Boondock

There was no snow or ice buildup on the track that I could see. The trail home was almost like a groomed trail due to the traffic that had been on it. I put it up on a block when I get home and run the track to clear it of ice and snow and did not notice anything that could have caused it (ice or snow).

Thanks for the quick replys guys!
 

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If your Tundra performed normally after the no-go incident, then I'd say that's what happened. I used to freight cabin building materials on an '84 Alpine years ago during construction of our cabin, and when we stopped for a beer & to let the Alpine cool down, that freight sled would invariably freeze to the trail. It didn't help that we consistantly had it overloaded to roughly 2,000 pounds.
So, we'd take our break, and I'd start the Alpine back up and then all of us would simultaneously kick the front end of the sled to break it loose, whereupon I would hop on the Alpine and take off. When you've got alot of weight on the sled you're pulling & have the right conditions, it'll freeze to the trail as fast as 1 minute.
The beauty of the Tundras is that they've got so much track to low power & light weight, so they'll just ease themselves along, rather than spinning that track and digging a nasty hole. You really couldn't ask for a better backwoods sled. I think your machine put full power to the work, and didn't spin like any other sled would have, and by you getting off it you broke the sleigh loose.

One of my brothers didn't believe me about how incredible the Tundra is in powder - he's got a new 700 RMK that will bust open any mountain. He thought I was fulla shit about how I could do more in unbroken backwoods powder than he could, until we decided to break open a trail to Sockeye Lake (Northeast of Talkeetna, Alaska 20 miles). It's about a 1,000 foot climb in about 1 mile, through the woods with no trail. Some of those hills are nightmarish. That RMK did absolutely fantastic when he could get it pointed with no trees in the way, but he was as bad off as the trail machines (there were 6 of us) when he had to stop & search for a way through the pucker brush.
I put-putted around, searching for the way through, didn't matter to the Tundra if it was 45 degrees uphill or level ground, over stumps & through the trees. He finally just sat with the rest of the crew whilst I scouted around & found the way after 4 major stuck incidents. He's a believer, now.

Anyway, my theory is that your sleigh was frozen to the trail, give it a good kick as you're ready to take off next time! :)
 

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Tundra Guy:
You talk about the snowmobile but no mention of what load you were pulling, or snow conditions, or what your runners are, maybe you were expecting too much ?
I have 5 toboggans from 6.5 ft to 10 ft long. All except one have polyethylene bottoms. With the 10 ft I have hauled two dressed bull moose, hides and heads with a 440. Now poly is fairly good for not freezing down, steel would be the worst. If I have trouble starting I simply pull the hitch sideways a bit and when I start up the toboggan rotates a bit which breaks it free.
Remember if you have runners on a hard pack trail the runners may be running on a film of water, ice skates as in hockey players are on a thin film of water, that is why friction is so low.
I have had used a number of different toboggans with different bottoms and poly is by far the best. I use them to haul loads up to 1000 lbs and usually pull a 10 ft and an 8 ft behind one snowmobile and some times break trail at that, but not with 1000 pounds on one sleigh, if I do that it is only one toboggan.

Old Cheetah
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Hello Cheetah and NighTrain

The load was only about 500lbs and the sleigh was 8ft long. The runners are polished oak (I will build my own this summer and it will have the polythylene runners), and actually slides pretty well. There was no new snow, and the trail was hard packed.

I think the tundra may have frozen up somewhere, but am not sure as this is my first machine (ever!), and I hadn't been on one since I was about 21 (trust me, that was a while back ... heheheh). While I was trying to take off the tundra did not move (as it would for an inch or two until the sleigh stopped it had the sleigh been frozen) until I stood up, then it went no problem.

I am now thinking that: i) I had better stay away from the gym and diet to lose a bit more weight ... heheheh; or ii) there was a thin layer of ice somewhere in my track as Old Cheetah said.

However, if any more suggestions/ideas/comments/etc. come up I will gladly read them!

Thanks all!
 
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