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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
quite a few people showed interest in these pics that I put up before so heres a little info and some more pics of it. I dont know to much about it except that is was used to load Ore into shipping boats in lake Superior, there is also some on lake Michigan too. This one is the biggest one Ive been too. This one is in Ashland Wi, and is one of the largest in the world. Unfortunately according to many of the people in the area it is going to be torn down in the next year or so. I would recommend riding to it sometime soon if you can. Though seeing it get torn down would be a sight to c, but a really bummer something so big will be taken away from us. 201064185528796_33241.jpg
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Those ore docks are pretty cool.

Heres a picture of it in use
http://www.boatnerd.com/news/newpictures/josephlblock-6-25-01-kr-pg.jpg
 

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Would love to ride there next winter. I am thinking it would be an overnighter from saint germain.
 

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I also concur about the interest in and allure of the ore docks, this dock that I took pictures of back in 07 are located on Lake Superior's north shore in the city of Marquette Mi, for sure they are awesome structures and pictures do not do them any justice because when you right up close and personal their size will really make you stand there and go WOW!!!!!


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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
yeah its hard to get a scale on them really, thats why I put the one of me climbing onto it up. I have the purple Kodiak jacket on, when I was climbing up I had to jump to get a grip on where I was, Im only 5 7, and where the water was frozen It was at least 8 feet to where I my cousin was standing. Yeah the ones in marquette are really cool too, you can see in those that the train trusses leading up to it were taken down, very impressive though. And I think the pic that Dekk85 put up is of a different one that was either by the marquette area or more towards duluth. The pics of the one we went to are from the Soo line, and its called the SOO ore dock.
 

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98700xc said:
I also concur about the interest in and allure of the ore docks, this dock that I took pictures of back in 07 are located on Lake Superior's [highlight=red]South[/highlight=red] shore in the city of Marquette Mi, for sure they are awesome structures and pictures do not do them any justice because when you right up close and personal their size will really make you stand there and go WOW!!!!!


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Fixed [:D]
 

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WOW!!!! Those Ore docks are very cool and big! Thank you guys for sharing the pictures! I have never seen or even known of one before. Now I need to look online and see if I can see if there is any by me. I live about 10 miles from the southern half of Lake Michigan. On the southwest corner of Michigan. I'm not sure if there would be anything like that by me or not.
 

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Well I just did some looking online and found some interesting info about the Ore docks. Figured I would post them up. So people can find out more about them. Sorry For butting in on your post JEEPS101 I just think they are very cool!



Today there is one ore dock gracing Ashland’s waterfront. This was purported to be the largest dock in the world of its kind when it was built. It was the last ore dock built on Chequamegon’s shore. People often ask, “what preceded this?” Let’s take a look.

In 1884/1885, the Milwaukee, Lake Shore and Western Railway built the first ore dock here. It stood 1405 feet in length, 46 feet wide and 40 feet high. The trestle approach was 950 feet long. There were 234 pockets, 117 to a side. There were 4 tracks on this dock. It had a capacity of 25,000 tons of ore. The contractor, C.C. Smith of LaCrosse, was awarded the bid on Sept. 27, 1884. The dock was designed by L.J. Barr, engineer. It took 7 thousand piles to form the dock basin, which was filled solid from the bottom of the harbor to 19 inches above the high water mark. The two and one half million feet of timber used to build the dock was harvested around Chequamegon Bay and sawn at the Union Mill in Ashland. The fill in the dock basin included 576,000 cubic feet or 4,500 cords of wood and 10,000,000 pounds of rock. There was connection to the city water system for fire safety, with fire hydrants and hose on top and bottom of the dock. This dock was dismantled in 1936 beginning in March and ending in October.

1886/1887 saw the Wisconsin Central building its original ore dock. The cost of this dock was $280,000.00. The dock was 1,400 feet in length with a 1,600 foot approach. It had 1,000 feet of hose distributed in 10 hose boxes. There were also one day and one night watchman. This dock was raised and rebuilt in approximately 1899 making it 1,900 feet long and 50 feet high. This dock burned to the water on November 22,1902. This dock had two railroad tracks on top.



1888 was the year Dock # 2 of the Milwaukee, Lake Shore and Western Railway was completed. It was raised and remodeled in 1898 standing 1,668 feet long , 70 feet high, having 278 pockets with a capacity of 55,600 tons. This dock burned on January 16, 1924, with Ironwood and Superior fire departments called to help douse the fire. The rebuilding began on January 23rd, 1924 to be shipping by May 1st , the same year. Dock number two was dismantled in 1948.

1915/1916 saw the beginning of the current dock. The Wisconsin Central had been bought out by the Minneapolis, St. Paul and Sault Saint Marie Railroad (the Soo Line). This dock was designed by Toltz Engineering Company of St. Paul, MN and built by General Contractors; Foley Brothers and Peppard and Fulton of St. Paul. This dock is built of concrete and steel. 900 feet in length with 150 pockets. It had a capacity of 52,500 tons. The timber trestle approach was 1,000 feet long. The dock was 65 feet wide at the water line and 59 feet wide at the top. It was 80 feet high. It had 6800 piles driven to support it, took two years to construct and had 4 tracks. A 900 foot addition was made to this concrete dock in 1925. It now sported 314 pockets.

The Chicago, Northwestern Railway bought out the Milwaukee, Lake Shore and Western Railway. They built a third dock in 1916/1917 with ore being shipped by June of 1917. It had 100 pockets per side which were electric powered. The dock had a total capacity of 50,000 tons. The dock had 4 tracks. In September of 1920 a 1,000 foot addition was announced. An additional 140 pockets, 70 per side, were added. It had a total length of 2200 feet long, which included 1500 feet of dock and 700 feet of approach. It was 73 feet high. The 8,000 piles driven were supplied by the Rust – Owen Lumber Company of Drummond, WI. Grand and Smith Construction Co. of St Paul did the construction.

In 1916 Chicago, Northwestern Railway announced that a fourth dock would be built but it never came to fruition. Beginning with the 1957 ore season, all ore was shipped over the Soo Line concrete dock under a pool arrangement. The C &NW dock #3 was dismantled soon after. The last shipment of ore was in 1965. The iron ore era had come to an end for Ashland.
 

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There's three docks in Two Harbors, MN(my hometown) and it's pretty intimidating to pull up to them in a 13' boat. There's also some in Duluth, Ashland and Marquette with Superior having the largest ore dock.

http://pcgladiator.blogspot.com/2009/03/ore-docks-of-lake-superior.html

Festus33 said:
98700xc said:
I also concur about the interest in and allure of the ore docks, this dock that I took pictures of back in 07 are located on Lake Superior's [highlight=red]South[/highlight=red] shore in the city of Marquette Mi, for sure they are awesome structures and pictures do not do them any justice because when you right up close and personal their size will really make you stand there and go WOW!!!!!


20106421155718_8010.jpg
20106421151415_8010.jpg
201064211522686_8010.jpg
Fixed [:D]

lol, you wouldn't believe how many people think of the whole UP as the "north shore" even when talking about lake superior. Trolls just don't get it I guess?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
buckfever said:
Well I just did some looking online and found some interesting info about the Ore docks. Figured I would post them up. So people can find out more about them. Sorry For butting in on your post JEEPS101 I just think they are very cool!



Today there is one ore dock gracing Ashland’s waterfront. This was purported to be the largest dock in the world of its kind when it was built. It was the last ore dock built on Chequamegon’s shore. People often ask, “what preceded this?” Let’s take a look.

In 1884/1885, the Milwaukee, Lake Shore and Western Railway built the first ore dock here. It stood 1405 feet in length, 46 feet wide and 40 feet high. The trestle approach was 950 feet long. There were 234 pockets, 117 to a side. There were 4 tracks on this dock. It had a capacity of 25,000 tons of ore. The contractor, C.C. Smith of LaCrosse, was awarded the bid on Sept. 27, 1884. The dock was designed by L.J. Barr, engineer. It took 7 thousand piles to form the dock basin, which was filled solid from the bottom of the harbor to 19 inches above the high water mark. The two and one half million feet of timber used to build the dock was harvested around Chequamegon Bay and sawn at the Union Mill in Ashland. The fill in the dock basin included 576,000 cubic feet or 4,500 cords of wood and 10,000,000 pounds of rock. There was connection to the city water system for fire safety, with fire hydrants and hose on top and bottom of the dock. This dock was dismantled in 1936 beginning in March and ending in October.

1886/1887 saw the Wisconsin Central building its original ore dock. The cost of this dock was $280,000.00. The dock was 1,400 feet in length with a 1,600 foot approach. It had 1,000 feet of hose distributed in 10 hose boxes. There were also one day and one night watchman. This dock was raised and rebuilt in approximately 1899 making it 1,900 feet long and 50 feet high. This dock burned to the water on November 22,1902. This dock had two railroad tracks on top.



1888 was the year Dock # 2 of the Milwaukee, Lake Shore and Western Railway was completed. It was raised and remodeled in 1898 standing 1,668 feet long , 70 feet high, having 278 pockets with a capacity of 55,600 tons. This dock burned on January 16, 1924, with Ironwood and Superior fire departments called to help douse the fire. The rebuilding began on January 23rd, 1924 to be shipping by May 1st , the same year. Dock number two was dismantled in 1948.

1915/1916 saw the beginning of the current dock. The Wisconsin Central had been bought out by the Minneapolis, St. Paul and Sault Saint Marie Railroad (the Soo Line). This dock was designed by Toltz Engineering Company of St. Paul, MN and built by General Contractors; Foley Brothers and Peppard and Fulton of St. Paul. This dock is built of concrete and steel. 900 feet in length with 150 pockets. It had a capacity of 52,500 tons. The timber trestle approach was 1,000 feet long. The dock was 65 feet wide at the water line and 59 feet wide at the top. It was 80 feet high. It had 6800 piles driven to support it, took two years to construct and had 4 tracks. A 900 foot addition was made to this concrete dock in 1925. It now sported 314 pockets.

The Chicago, Northwestern Railway bought out the Milwaukee, Lake Shore and Western Railway. They built a third dock in 1916/1917 with ore being shipped by June of 1917. It had 100 pockets per side which were electric powered. The dock had a total capacity of 50,000 tons. The dock had 4 tracks. In September of 1920 a 1,000 foot addition was announced. An additional 140 pockets, 70 per side, were added. It had a total length of 2200 feet long, which included 1500 feet of dock and 700 feet of approach. It was 73 feet high. The 8,000 piles driven were supplied by the Rust – Owen Lumber Company of Drummond, WI. Grand and Smith Construction Co. of St Paul did the construction.

In 1916 Chicago, Northwestern Railway announced that a fourth dock would be built but it never came to fruition. Beginning with the 1957 ore season, all ore was shipped over the Soo Line concrete dock under a pool arrangement. The C &NW dock #3 was dismantled soon after. The last shipment of ore was in 1965. The iron ore era had come to an end for Ashland.
Not a problem I welcome the input of info about these things, they should be seen and enjoyed, and if people know more or can get more info thats great. It is amazing some of the ones they have built, I do believe this was one of the biggest ever made, and it is for sure the biggest one still in existence.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
There is a sight if I can find it for what they plan on doing to it. They dont want to tear down the whole thing, but they want to turn it into more of a tourist attraction. Some of the designs I have seen look alright, The full length would be left, and certain parts of it would remain up. The new building ideas would be incorporated into what is there now. http://www.ci.ashland.wi.us/node/413 heres some info on it. I think its terrible they want to tear something so large down
 

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Yes it's a neat piece of machinery, but you have to remember it is just an old piece of industrial machinery. The local government inherited the dock when it was abandoned, and with the state of our current social structure it is up to the government to keep us from hurting ourselves on it. This means they have to spend the time and money to maintain the structure so that nobody kills themselves being stupid. Or the other option is to tear it down and sell the scrap. As neat as old structures are, what would we have today if we preserved everything? Visit it while you can, make memories and show others its beauty so you can remember it later.
 

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That has potential to be a huge tourist attraction. It would cost more for demolition than restoration. It would be cool to see it turned into a historical site or something.
 

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JEEPS101 said:
quite a few people showed interest in these pics that I put up before so heres a little info and some more pics of it. I dont know to much about it except that is was used to load Ore into shipping boats in lake Superior, there is also some on lake Michigan too. This one is the biggest one Ive been too. This one is in Ashland Wi, and is one of the largest in the world. Unfortunately according to many of the people in the area it is going to be torn down in the next year or so. I would recommend riding to it sometime soon if you can. Though seeing it get torn down would be a sight to c, but a really bummer something so big will be taken away from us. 201064185528796_33241.jpg
201064185540796_33241.jpg
201064185552890_33241.jpg
201064185615155_33241.jpg
201064185638624_33241.jpg
20106418572921_33241.jpg
201064185726233_33241.jpg
201064185738811_33241.jpg


You sparked my interest when you first posted those pictures. Found a satellite view of it.
201065234446124_24996.jpg


That would be cool to get a bunch of people together this next season and ride out to see it in person.[:)] Anybody game????
About the teardown, I've heard it's scheduled for teardown, but nobody is saying exactly when.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
its in the link I posted I believe, but yeah I think personally they should keep it up and turn it into a tourist attraction so people can still visit it in some form. It would bring more commerce. But yeah I dont wanna start anything powersledder, but the gov has no place in keeping us from doing anything, if people are dumb enough to get killed off of it its there fault and we should not suffer from there stupidity. But I dont wanna argue, I do agree something should be done with it, instead of preserving it as it is if it can provide more commerce fore the area that would be great. Check the link I posted http://www.ci.ashland.wi.us/node/413 theres some pretty cool ideas on here.
 
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