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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 2003 Pro X 8 was a slug right from the get go, but with some CDI re-call replacement, re-jetting, a Tempa Flow and some clutching it's really coming around. It's starting to pull like an 800 should and it handles near perfectly. Still has a little too much ski lift powering through corners, but that should be cured early this season with some tweaking. I have one other clutching tweak to do as well and then I think I will be more than happy with the engine performance.
Has anyone else with the 800 had these same issues and what have you done to really turn it on!
 

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XLTSPl, he is probably talking about last winter because that was his first post, and that is why he is talking about next winter too.

Pro Xate, Welcome to TUSF. This is a great place to talk about sleds as long as you follow the site's rules. It gets pretty interesting in winter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the welcome, and you're right, I have just found this site. I look forward to some great and interesting posts this winter, but I could chat sleds all year round. You need to help me with the TUSF acronym though.

Thanks,
 

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Welcome to the forum man, any tips on the 800 are welcome, a friend of mine has a 2003 XC 800 SP and his has been pretty crummy, I can beat it with my 2003 Pro X 600.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
My 2001 Edge X 600 would out run the 2003 Pro X 800 when I first got it. The 600 runs exceptionally well, BUT..... So, I was motivated fairly soon in my Pro X relationship to get the thing working the way it should. Now the 600 is comparable up to 80 mph, in fact it usually gets the jump and stays 1/2 a sled length in front but the 800 has the torque to pull well past the 100 mph mark.
 

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Welcome to TUSF! Reading your post made me think of how so many people do no tweaking whatsoever and just live with what they get from the factory. I've got lots of buddies that buy it, fill it with gas and oil and off they go. They don't even adjust the clutching. Jetting???? Whoa, that fuel mixture stuff is voodoo man! Heck, that's why they invented EFI isn't it? They sit at the bottom of the hill and wonder why they can't follow some of the other similar sleds. A little adjustment here and there by someone that knows how, and they are like "Wow, it's never performed like that before!"

This is a great place to learn some how-to stuff.

Flange
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Flange, you're absolutely right! The majority of the guys I ride with go straight for the loud pipes to get the edge over the rest of the pack and forget the basics. I tend to start with getting the machine to work as well as it can in the stock form. By that I mean changes like jetting, clutching with OEM parts, gearing and chassis adjustment are still within stock limits. Once you get the machine working the way it is intended to work, you'll be amazed at the results and likely shock your buddies riding bigger iron. I agree that there's "no replacement for displacement" but that only applies on an even playing field. A well tuned "stock" 600 will easily perform as well, if not better than an out of tune 700. I've never picked up a sled from the dealer that didn't need some "adjustments", so I would agree with you Flange that buddies like yours and mine are riding "out of tune" sleds right from the dealer and can't be bothered to tweak a little bit which results in an average running sled. Those who spend a little time and effort on their sled making it work like the engineers intended are rewarded with a grin each time they ride.
 

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Pro Xate, I met a guy last year that spent CDN$700 on a set of pipes. So far, nothing out of the ordinary you might say. Well...then I asked him if he had to change the RPM to match his new pipes. He looked at me like I had two heads. I briefly explained to him that most pipes are specifically tuned to perform at a certain RPM where they produce maximum power. He asked how he could change the RPM of his engine and again I briefly discussed clutching. After I got home I looked up his pipes on the web and found that he was running 400-500 revs too high. He was way over the peak of the power curve. Unfortunately, I never saw him again.
 
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