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Discussion Starter #1
After reading some of the replies to the "Scariest moments on at sled" it appears as if running on the lakes and open water create the most tense memories. I have found that after I had intentionally travelled over open water I had a more secure feeling because I knew what to expect. I have found that if you are travelling between 30 to 50 MPH you would hardly notice a change from ice to water. I do not suggest you charge out the door and try this. A warm day with a section of open water about three feet deep is suggested. Also have some other sleds near by. PS I have not sunk my sled yet, and hate cold water.
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE id=quote><font size=1 face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id=quote>quote:<hr height=1 noshade id=quote>Originally posted by canadiantim2:
I had a more secure feeling because I knew what to expect.
[/quote]


I know where your coming from, I have hit a couple small open water patches with much sucess. When you EXPECT something it's a lot easier to take than not EXPECTING it, that's where I'm coming from and most likely the others too... IMO
 

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Most water I have driven on is about 6 inches in a ditch with snow on either side and that was enough for me. If I wanted to ride on water I woulda bought a PWC.


Trees don't make the greatest brakes.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
This experience does come in handy. I have seen enough of the results of locking up the brakes due to fear, and then the splash. The world record for travel is something like 52 miles on lake Ontario. At the end of the season when the streams start to run, the ice that was good is not.
 
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