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For starters you have a front shock/spring. Adjusting this shock is done by turning the collar on the spring to either stiffen or soften the spring. Basically you want this shock to be as soft as possible without bottoming out on the big hits. Increasing the stiffness of this spring will decrease ski pressure, while decreasing the stiffness will add ski pressure. The stiffer this spring is set; you will have a rough ride on the little bumps, but will handle the big hits better. It’s all a matter of what you do with the sled.

Then you have the limiter Straps. The purpose of the limiter strap is to restrict the amount of weight transfer. Generally speaking there are a series of holes that can be used to set the limiter strap to a desired length. Shorten up the limiter straps to reduce weight transfer and lengthen them to increase the amount of weight transfer. Weight Transfer is what leads to the skis coming up in the air. Typically you only want the skis to come off the ground a couple of inches (IF at all) when you punch the gas, anything more is a waste and is also taking away from steering ability in the corners when you get on the gas out of the corner. Tightening the limiter straps will also add ski pressure.

Next we come to the Rear Shock and Springs. There isn’t a lot of adjustment here without replacing the springs or revalving the shock. However there are adjustment blocks that will adjust the stiffness of the rear springs. Typically there are three positions you can use. The softest is the shortest side of the block and the stiffest is the longest side of the block. This will affect weight transfer and suspension Sag. Stiffer setting equals less transfer and Sag. Typically you want about 4 inches of sag, this allows your suspension to “drop” into holes/moguls, allowing for a smoother ride. Softer springs can be installed for lighter riders or heavier springs for heavy riders if needed. Sag is measured by lifting the bumper until the rear suspension is full extended. Measure the distance between the ground and the bumper. Now get on the sled fully dressed in your riding gear and sit down. Give a couple of little bounces on the seat and then get off the sled. Now measure the distance between the ground and your bumper. The difference in measurements is the Sag.

Last but not least you may have Scissor Stop Blocks, in front of and behind the rear arm. These blocks adjust the weight transfer. It is recommended to leave the Front Scissor Stop in its stock position. If you look at the front block you will see that changing it will push your rear arm’s starting position further back thus leading to excessive transfer. Adjusting the Rear Scissor Stop will allow you to drastically adjust the amount of weight transfer. Once again the short side of the block will be the softest setting (More Transfer) and the long side of the block will be the stiffest setting (Less Transfer). Not only can you turn the block to different positions but you can also physically move the block to a new mounting hole further back. The further back the block is the more transfer you will have before the rear arm hits the block, thus beginning the coupling of the suspension and moving the weight back towards the front.

Ok so what does this all mean? Your goal is to get the suspension setup such that you get good weight transfer (not excessive), Good Sag and Spring setup for a great ride through the bumps, and to top it all off you want to make sure it’s balanced to the front suspension. If you have too little weight on the skis you will not have enough bite in the corners and if you have too much weight on the skis the sled will be hard to turn and will not have a great hole shot (i.e. Lack of Traction) and may want to slide around on you while going straight down the trail. Think of the suspension as a teeter-totter, the middle shock is the pivot point and your goal is to keep the board balanced with just a little bit of forward/backward movement. After you have the rear skid setup as desired, then adjust the SKI shock springs to either decrease or increase the ski pressure as needed. A BIG note, changes should be made little by little, if you do to many things at one time you wont know which change caused the Good/Bad results.
 

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Are you answering a question? Or providing a 101 on suspension tuning?
 
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