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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is Ski column Camber??? How is it measured?? Ho is it adjusted???


I recently put on a new pair of skis on my '96 Ultra SKS.. They've caused the inside ski to lift excessivly compared to my old skis....

Is this a good place to start looking???
 

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I'll explain it using an automobile, it's easier.

Camber is a measurement of how far in or out the top of the wheels are to the bottom of the wheels. This means that the wheels are not perfectly straight up and down, and if you were looking at the car from the rear the wheels will appear to be tipped in toward the top. Camber is usually measured in degrees (- and +). Most cars have 0 degrees camber for maximum efficiency. High performance cars usually have a (-) negative camber on the it's wheels to increase it's effectiveness at gripping hard corners. A typical measurement may be -1 degree camber and sometimes up to -2. However, it shorten's the life of the tires, and sometimes it also sacrifices some traction when braking. Therefore, it's normally only done to the rear wheels.

A negative camber on a snowmobile will improve it's cornering ability in snow. It gives you more traction because of it's angle. Since you've put those new skis on, i'm sure they have a deeper keel or dual runners or something to increase it's traction. If you have a Polaris, then you can adjust the camber by adjusting the radius rods length. Just loosen the lock nut at both ends of the rod and rotate the shaft to increase or decrease it's length. Be careful not to go too far.

Usually, if you have a problem with ski lift it's due to too high of a CG: center of gravity. Loosening the springs on the front suspension will lower your ride height and improve cornering, but also sacrifices suspension travel. Adjusting your camber close to "0" will probably also minimize ski lift, however it does so because your ski will be sliding rather than gripping! So, i'm not sure if camber is something you want to change. Ski lift will always become a problem any time you increase it's traction. Perhaps using a shorter 4" carbide wearbar would help. The only other thing i can say is to simply lean your body more in hard corners.
Hope this helps. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sled is a 1996 Polaris Indy Ultra SKS

You can deffinatly say These new skis have more bite.... I've gone from Standard Indy Steel skis with 4' carbides and skins to SLP Powder Pros. As for carbides I've got the least agressive ones (6" 90 deg.) that SLP has for the skis. I'm allready completely blown away with how these skis preform compared to the junk that was on there.... Once I get the inside ski lifting problem solved I think I'm really going to be in for a treat.

As for leaning...(hahaha) I can hang off the mountain bar as far over as possible to the inside and that damn inside ski will still come up about a foot!

The front suspension is about as loose as it can get and is quite soft..... Could it be too soft???

Now on adjusting the ski camber.... If the top is tilted in more than the bottom is this positive or negative camber???

What about changing where the center shock limiting strap is set???? How short should it be???



Thanks for the explanation.... the car comarison was a good one.
 
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