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I have a 1997 zr 440 and i am really on the fence about studding it or not. So whats the plus and negatives of having a studded track?
 

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Pros: added traction, better starting and stopping on ice. Can add safety(i slid down a power line hill cause the top was solid ice.)

Cons: added weight, cost, time to install them, reduce track life, and when the track blows its gonna do some damage
 

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Pros: better traction, acceleration, stopping ect.
cons: gas stations and parking lots can suck and its easy to get stuck on them because the track spins.
 

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i think they are dangerous as all hell, last year i was up north and a root was popping through the trail going around the corner and a pik caught and almost threw me off and rolled my sled.
 

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same as above, pros: better traction, accelaration, braking distance is shorter, etc.
cons: cost, time to install, wears things out faster.
some days my studs piss me off.
 

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i am willing to loose some integrety to my sled as long as i am adding safety,which studs are,and have saved me a couple of time coming down ice covered hills to stops signs. thats just my opinion
 

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If you ride a lot of lakes and rivers like me, put them on. I won't own a sled without them. Plain and simple. Just have to be a little careful in the garage or driveway. You will spin a lot more on blacktop or concrete.
 

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02zr440sp said:
i am willing to loose some integrety to my sled as long as i am adding safety,which studs are,and have saved me a couple of time coming down ice covered hills to stops signs. thats just my opinion
Yeah, studs definitely add safety. We were riding power lines 2 years ago up by Gaylord. My buddy went up on his little 440 Jag no problem, but he spun a lot at the top. I hit it on my sled, and i actually saw the top of the hill and my buddy, then all of a sudden i stopped and started going backwards. I slid 2-300ft down a hill with trees all around me, and i was going at a good pace. The only control i had was the skis. If i had studs i would've made it up and over no problem. For the next couple days i was scared to climb any hill, and at one point i sat at the bottom of some power line hills and let my brother and our buddy go on and play for a while until i got up the nerve to climb em.
 

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I will never trail ride without them......PERIOD!!!!!!, but if your location dictates that there is always deep snow or mountain riding then that is a different story, I have seen first hand what can happen when trail riding on icy trails, it was not my sled but after it was all said and done a virtually brand new 96 XLT with less than 400 miles on it ended up with $2800 in damage.
 

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BJ.Hardly...

Really??? That was a joke right??

That being said, you can never beat a properly studded track..NEVER!

Only con I can think of is scratched garage/trailer floors...

Do not forget extra carbide up front too!
 

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i brought 3 race sled and all of them had studs. i took them all and never gonna put them back on.

my floor on my shack is ruined!
 

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Go pics or go home...

I've only ever had one sled that wasn't picked, and it sucked for trail use. When I replaced the track, I put a picked one on, and never looked back.
 

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Always run studs in my area. Do a track inspection every now and then. On rough rocky terrain(early conditions) you can tear a hole with a rocking stud, especially when using steel, aluminum backer plates. Atleast with using plastic backers the backer will break before a hole is ripped.
No real diadvantages in my mind. Use your brain and don't blame the studs or machine for your stupidity. Don't lite up the track in a garage or shed. Yes they do damage. Remember your track is now off the ground as the stud tips are hitting first on hard ground.

Track longevity is not as bad as most anti-studding guys want you to beleive. If you use throttle control when crossing roads. Leave slowly and minamize damage to your equipment and the road surface.
I know of guys will over 10,000 miles on studded tracks.
 

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I have had studded and nonstudded tracks. I haven't had a studded track on my trail sled for over 10 years and don't miss it one bit. My preference is nonstudded. I have yet to blow a corner plus I can ride the paved trail in my area.
 

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^^ yep, had studs back in the day. the only reason i have them now is because i got the sled with them. if i change tracks i will not go back to them
 

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Had 144 in the OEM track. Swapped the Camo Cobra in unstudded and love it so far. It is way better if there is any deeper stuff/powder and I think it stops just as good. A couple slippery corners but they can be rode through as long as you don't come into them overly HOT. Studs have their place and I agree they make some conditions better/safer. My stock track had 7K on it before I lost a stud. Its all in how you treat it.
 

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OhioPolarisKid said:
Pros: added traction, better starting and stopping on ice. Can add safety(i slid down a power line hill cause the top was solid ice.)

Cons: added weight, cost, time to install them, reduce track life, and when the track blows its gonna do some damage[/color=red]


I've personally assisted two separate people on two separate occasions this year replace a track, BOTH of which were non studded. Both sleds had between 5000-6000 miles on them, both of them showed major signs of wear. I am considering resharpening the studs on my XCSP with 5400 miles on it with absolutely no signs of track wear. No tear-outs, studded 144 every other outside row.

No matter what, when a track blows, it's gonna do damage...studded or non-studded, you're pretty much screwed.

Yes, if you're not careful, you can spin the studded track on concrete. I've seen non-studded tracked sleds get stuck in the middle of a parking lot (ie gas station, restaurant) because their 4" carbides gripped in and the rubber track can't do anything on ice.

I ride in northern Wisconsin and the UP. I won't ever ride without them, because thats what works with our trails. Parts of Copper Island, the Arrowhead have 3'+ snow, studs won't be as beneficial as say southern to most northern parts of our state. It all depends on where you ride.
 

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TrailRebel said:
I've seen non-studded tracked sleds get stuck in the middle of a parking lot (ie gas station, restaurant) because their 4" carbides gripped in and the rubber track can't do anything on ice.
That reminds me, a couple of us were out the other year riding. Came across a road and a buddy got stuck half way into the road. He had no studs. Good thing no cars came along when he was pushing it off the ice. I had no problems with studs.
 

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Hangman said:
TrailRebel said:
I've seen non-studded tracked sleds get stuck in the middle of a parking lot (ie gas station, restaurant) because their 4" carbides gripped in and the rubber track can't do anything on ice.
That reminds me, a couple of us were out the other year riding. Came across a road and a buddy got stuck half way into the road. He had no studs. Good thing no cars came along when he was pushing it off the ice. I had no problems with studs.
Three years ago I had to jump up and down on the back of my riding partners' sled to get it going because he had gotten half way across and got stuck. There was a motorist sitting there waiting for him to get out of the roadway. Since then, he had put studs on his sled... finally.

P S We looked like complete morons.
 
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