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Another in the news..
http://jalopnik.com/5488716/runaway-toyota-prius-stopped-by-california-patrol-car

Someone find me the video of the guy pointing at the car and saying "I am never driving that again!!!" [lol8]
 

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Saw it on the news this morning. I'm curious as to how this person was unable to or why they didn't turn off the car. Now, I realize in a situation like this, panic would make it more difficult, but he was unable to stop the car for some 30 miles??? Apparently these cars don't have a regular ignition, just an electronic radio key and a push button start, but there still has to be a stop button of some sort. Just push the damn thing!

Another thing that really boggles my mind is why are we hearing about ALL of this right now??? How come we haven't gotten reports about this in the past? Strange to think, everyone is reporting problems now that it is in the open. Just coincidence or are people trying to make some money out of the deal by being dishonest? Not saying there aren't problems, but it makes a person think.

Toyota has some major work to do here.... I say, good luck.
 

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Lawsuits total 3 billion already and its just the beginning.
Sounds like Yota screwed the pooch on this one.

Class-action lawsuits could cost Toyota $3B-plus


MIAMI – Toyota owners claiming that massive safety recalls are causing the value of their vehicles to plummet have filed at least 89 class-action lawsuits that could cost the Japanese auto giant $3 billion or more, according to an Associated Press review of cases, legal precedent and interviews with experts.

Those estimates do not include potential payouts for wrongful death and injury lawsuits, which could reach in the tens of millions each. Still, the sheer volume of cases involving U.S. Toyota owners claiming lost value — 6 million or more — could prove far more costly, adding up to losses in the billions for the automaker.

Such class-action lawsuits "are more scary for Toyota than the cases where people actually got injured," said Tom Baker, a University of Pennsylvania law professor. "A super-big injury case would be $20 million. But you could have millions of individual car owners who could (each) be owed $1,000. If I were Toyota, I'd be more worried about those cases."

As Toyota continues to deal with the recalls and wavering public confidence in its vehicle safety, its biggest financial fight may be in the courtroom. A key decision could come at a March 25 hearing in San Diego, where a panel of federal judges will consider whether to consolidate the mushrooming cases into a single jurisdiction.

After that, a judge will decide whether all claims filed by Toyota owners nationwide can be combined in a single legal action — known as "certifying a class" — and whether the claims have enough merit to move toward either trial or settlement.

Toyota owners suing the company contend their vehicles have dropped in value because of the recalls and that Toyota knew all along about safety problems but concealed them from buyers. They point to evidence such as Kelley Blue Book's decision this month to lower the resale value of recalled Toyotas an average of 3.5 percent, ranging from $300 less for a Corolla to $750 less for a Sequoia.

The lawsuits started appearing on state and federal dockets last fall, when Toyota began recalling some 8 million vehicles worldwide because of persistent complaints about sudden unintended acceleration. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports that 52 people have died in accelerator-related crashes.

The AP conducted an extensive review of federal court filings and uncovered a total of 89 class-action lawsuits filed nationwide as of Monday. Toyota attorneys said last week in a court filing that the company is aware of 82 such cases.

One leading attorney in the class-action effort, Northeastern University law professor Tim Howard, said the number of owners claiming economic damages because of the recalls could reach 6 million. If each were awarded $500 — likely a conservative estimate — Toyota would have to fork over $3 billion in economic loss damages alone.

This does not include possible payouts in wrongful death or injury cases as well as lawsuits filed by shareholders claiming losses from share prices that have tumbled more than 16 percent since January.

Corporations often settle big cases rather than risk an even bigger damage award at a trial.

Automakers in the past have been forced to pay vehicle owners for lost value because of safety problems. Ford, for example, agreed in 2008 to compensate 800,000 Explorer owners who sued because of rollover dangers. That settlement provided owners only with vouchers of between $300 and $500 to buy new Ford products.

In that case, the lawyers received about $25 million in fees and costs, and the Toyota case could result in a similar windfall for attorneys. A study by the Federal Judicial Center concluded attorneys in class-action lawsuits typically get fees between 27 percent and 30 percent of what they recover in damages — which could reach $1 billion in a $3 billion settlement.

Toyota could end up facing an even bigger payoff if a judge decides attorneys' fees should be added to any plaintiffs' award.

The San Diego hearing will be conducted before the seven-member Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation, which decides whether similar lawsuits filed in multiple federal districts should be centralized in one location for pretrial motions, hearings and the like. A federal judge would be chosen to determine whether the Toyota cases should be certified as a class action and make other key rulings, such as deciding on a likely Toyota motion to dismiss.

Under federal law, a class action must have 100 or more plaintiffs, damages sought must exceed $5 million and the judge must be persuaded the claims are identical or very similar. If a class is not certified, each lawsuit would have to be pursued on its own.

Toyota has so far recalled 5.6 million vehicles in the U.S. because of problems caused by what it says are accelerator pedals that become sticky or get trapped under floor mats. Another 437,000 Prius models have been recalled worldwide for what Toyota says is an antilock-braking glitch.

The vast majority of lawsuits claiming economic loss stem from the accelerator problems, and many contend the company's effort to fix floor mats or accelerator pedals are insufficient. Dozens of lawsuits claim Toyota has ignored problems with its electronic throttle system.

Separately, NHTSA is looking into claims from more than 60 Toyota owners that their vehicles continue to surge forward unexpectedly despite having their vehicles repaired.

Toyota has denied that its electronic throttle is to blame and has been focused on dealing with the recalls — a strategy that could affect the outcome of the lawsuits.

"Toyota's strategy (should be) to fix them, fix them immediately and at no cost, and do it as quickly and effectively as you can so after the dust settles, your car's value won't have depreciated much," said Edward C. Martin, a law professor at Cumberland School of Law at Samford University in Birmingham, Ala.

"We do not believe that electronics are at the root of this issue," Toyota spokesman Mike Michels said Monday.

In some of the lawsuits, Toyota owners seek additional damages because they're afraid to drive what they call "defective and dangerous" cars, while still others claim insurance premiums will likely go up.

"My wife has been worried about it for a while. She's eight months pregnant and she's terrified to drive the car now," said Jerry Borbon, a Miami lawyer who is still driving his 2008 Toyota Prius and is a plaintiff in a potential class-action lawsuit.

"We thought about trying to get rid of it, but we're stuck with it," he said, adding Toyota's damaged reputation has made it hard to sell the vehicle. "I don't feel secure in the car and I don't want my wife driving it."

"There are a lot of unknowns and the big questions are what did Toyota know when," said Catherine Sharkey, a professor at the New York University School of Law. "If it turns out that Toyota had knowledge of these defects and did not act soon enough, then the best strategy is settlement."

In a sign of the widespread impact of the recalls, a Los Angeles federal judge who has been assigned many of the potential Toyota class-action cases is concerned his ownership of a Toyota might force him off the cases.

U.S. District Judge A. Howard Matz put a one-paragraph statement into the dockets of more than two dozen cases:

"The court owns a 2000 Toyota Avalon SLX. In addition, the adult son of the court who has not lived in the court's home for many years owns a 2005 Prius."

Matz's statement also asks whether he or his son could be considered plaintiffs if the cases are certified as class actions. If so, the judge would not be able to preside over the cases because of a possible conflict of interest.


http://news.yahoo.com/video/losangelescbs2-15750780/chp-investigates-runaway-toyota-prius-18522045




Anyone know how this works?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Erick.. here is why you are hearing about it now and not before

And this internal document
http://jalopnik.com/5477096/toyota-internal-documents-brag-of-saving-100m-by-negotiating-limited-recall
 

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Has anyone heard of a Key??

One guy I talked too, said it's a puter flaw, there still hiding the real problem??
A "stuck" gas pedal wouldnt keep accelerating, and have other problems, I guess this guy tried to turn it off, it wouldnt.
 

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How confident would you be to turn the key off at 90+ miles per hour?
 

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I believe it to be a computer problem also.....

I think the puter sees a short as a normal condition,Wide open throttle. Where an open would be at idle.


So the computer logs no codes.
 

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How do the cars get stuck at WOT if the average person doesn't depress the pedal more than 30% on the highway? Is that the first intention? If it sticks, push it more? That is why a cable going to a carbureator is the way to go, you can shut that thing off and fix it without any kind of computer. Thats why I will refuse to buy any newer car when I get around to buying one. That, and the less options (power windows, power locks, other convieneinces)the less stuff there is to go wrong.

But why would the car not shift into neutral? If it doesn't move, pull harder untill something does. And shutting the car off should have worked but apparently the push-button start didn't work. I say the only thing controlling a car should be the driver, not what a computer thinks the driver means. I hate driving my moms car because you have no direct control over the throttle, its all electronic.
 

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Is the shifter computerized and not attached via linkage anymore? It seems to me the simple stopping tool would be to shift into neutral...
 

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The second generation Toyota Prius will not allow you to shift into neutral if the speed is above 20mph. I have seen this happen many times in the past. This has been a problem with this car since they started making them. The best thing to do in this situation is slowly apply the parking brake untill the vehicle slows below 20mph and then shift into neutral..
 

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Did you read the first article where lawyers for a class action lawsuit hired an engineering professor to make a video? The trumped up video had three wires cut in the wiring harness with a 200 ohm resistor between two of them, and a switch leading to the third cut wire. THEN they got the car to experience unintended acceleration. Yeah, those conditions happen often in normal everyday driving conditions. You want to know why you're hearing so much about it now? They estimate the lawsuits are going to total over $3 billion. There's your answer right there.
 

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Teicherc said:
Why can't you put it in N and pull over?
I dont get it, my first instinct would be to put in in N, NOT PUSH THE PEDAL HARDER!...WTF is wrong with people. If all else fails, a D to R drop at 90 would shut'er down! [beatup]

If it wont let you put it in N how about in a lower gear? A blone engine would stop'er. If none of those work its E-brake and 2 feet on the break pedal!
 

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MasterSkitelz said:
That is why a cable going to a carbureator is the way to go, you can shut that thing off and fix it without any kind of computer. Thats why I will refuse to buy any newer car when I get around to buying one. That, and the less options (power windows, power locks, other convieneinces)the less stuff there is to go wrong.

I hate driving my moms car because you have no direct control over the throttle, its all electronic.
Haha, wow...paranoid much?

readytoride said:
The second generation Toyota Prius will not allow you to shift into neutral if the speed is above 20mph. I have seen this happen many times in the past. This has been a problem with this car since they started making them. The best thing to do in this situation is slowly apply the parking brake untill the vehicle slows below 20mph and then shift into neutral..
That's ridiculous. You can't shift into neutral over 20 MPH? Sounds like a serious engineering mistake. I've shifted my Audi TTS into neutral at well over 130 MPH. Also, I've heard reports that the brakes on these cars aren't able to overpower the engine...sounds ridiculous to me. Any braking system on any car should be capable of generating enough braking force to stop a car under full engine load... if not, IMO - car = fail.

Rubi said:
You want to know why you're hearing so much about it now? They estimate the lawsuits are going to total over $3 billion. There's your answer right there.
My thoughts exactly. People heard they might be able to get some money out of the deal and go haywire trying to figure out a way to claim their car has experienced the issue.

In either case, sounds like we are missing some serious facts here...
 

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As most new cars have a MPH limiter, I wonder if the computer can also limit the revs? Might not be neccessary to blow the motor to stop.

I don't see how Toyota can claim that it is NOT the computer. It has virtually been proven that it is not the pedal or the mats. About the only thing disproven has been a "machanical" issue ie, mats, pedal. Their reputation is on the line here. I don't think they can discount with 100% certainty any possible casue without more testing.
 

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Rubi said:
Did you read the first article where lawyers for a class action lawsuit hired an engineering professor to make a video? The trumped up video had three wires cut in the wiring harness with a 200 ohm resistor between two of them, and a switch leading to the third cut wire. THEN they got the car to experience unintended acceleration. Yeah, those conditions happen often in normal everyday driving conditions. You want to know why you're hearing so much about it now? They estimate the lawsuits are going to total over $3 billion. There's your answer right there.

I am sure people see the blood in the water and the lawyers are having a field day, but that does not mean they dont have some serious issues.
 

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^^^And like any class action suit, the lawyers get rich and the claimants get squat!! Almost better to opt out of the class, wait until all is said and done, then file on your own.
 

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The report I've heard of say that over a certain speed, the shifter lever does nothing.

There has been a issue found by an outside source with the computer, the computer locks out the inputs, and ignores the shifter, throttle, brake sensors. Toyota is still in denial of this, but they are not going to have a choice soon.

My natural first reaction would be to turn the key off, but if it's just another input that's ignored, it would do no good.
 

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Wow, from what people are hearing about this car it sounds like you can do nothing to stop it if the situation happens. All good ideas as far as stopping the car, but I guess they basically built it like a trap. What a joke. Honestly I am so sick of the way things are made now days. I think the way the world turned 15-20 years ago was way better than what it is today. Everything is stupid and assbackwards now days!
 
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