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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The subject has come up in a couple threads in the last day or two. I just find it very interseting. So whatever you have to contribute is great. It's always good to hear stories from groomer drivers.

Safety, funny, stuck, inovation, history, eqipment, etc...

Here's my first little contribution: This is great!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3sOZYS0POHc
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
WoW!, This thing does a pretty good job...
Looks like for part of the vid' he has an attachment to groom for cross country skiers, then he it is removed for snowmobiles.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8Gdz3nzOPc
 

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this year we had GREAT snow in ohio, alot of uor wooded trails got pretty wooped up, so i used a new holland model 1920 4x4 trator with a power rake/ harley rake ( has cultivator tine in front and a rotating cutter bar that power angles in back) to groom our trails and it worked sweeet, well on the trails that were semi packed, tracto didnt go so good through the 20" of snow in the open fields but with the rake on the 3pt hitch i could just pick it up and motor through the deep stuff to the next wooped out section!

we are lookin for an alpine 2 for next year and are gunna build a drag! grooming is way fun! but the resuts are funner!
 

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My dad has a manawa groomer and a poalris widetrack with a really good electric drag that he built himself
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bgs1SwKwliw

no video of the widetrack but that thing is the best snowmobile you can buy it will go through anything, pull anything, and it always starts second pull.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
^That sure is a different looking groomer. Looks like it does a good job though.

I would like to make some kind of drag to have around here if we get snow like this last year again.
 

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They are selling our clubs groomer to upgrade, its probably 20 year old ski hill groomer, it does a good job tho.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
This guy is using some kind of roller thing?...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zeFWfMKPHqM

Here is a guy just using an old wood pallet, but it's not doing a half bad job...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_jbxpQTCAd8
 

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Heres our clubs 08 Tucker Sno Cat with a drag that we had built back before i was even with the club. Well be looking for a new drag next year.

201021981536187_21987.jpg

201021395831186_21987.jpg

View attachment 200911418349248_21987.bmp

View attachment 2009114183417795_21987.bmp

View attachment 200915221345826_21987.bmp

View attachment 200915221354389_21987.bmp

View attachment 200915221336670_21987.bmp

This was our 03 sno cat. This was in 06 i beleive when this happened. Fortunatly im taking this picture from a gravel road so all it took was a 4-wheel assist tractor to get me out of it, it still sucked though.

200821720327441_21987.jpg
 

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All of these drags im seeing on here would not work very good on our trails. Most of our trails are vulnerable to wind which makes the snow very hard. The begining of the year is pretty descent but once the cold temps along with the winds in jan and feb start, it can make for a damn rough ride in the groomer.
 

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What do you guys use. WE use Sno Boss drags behing our tuckers. Were looking at getting a new tucker this summer. A 2000 with rubber snow tracks, blade and 80 gallon tank.

You have the extended cab but run the short tracks. hmmm, interesting.
 

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The drag was built by a local fabricator from here. I beleive they either got some blue prints or took some demonsions off of another drag. It does do an ok job but its been with the club for about 10 years and its just getting time to upgrade. Right now its at the same shop where it was built to fix some cracks in the frame. Arrowhead makes some really nice drags( www.charlesvogelent.com )



Found this while looking at drags...guess you could qualify this as having a bad day.


201031614411107_21987.jpg
 

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Over Presidents Day weekend i was out in the Black Hills and ran into some guys from ND. I remember awhile back a thread being started about a groomer going into a drainage ditch of some sort, turned out that guys were groomer operators in the area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
As it says below, "worth reading!"



Grooming 101! Long, but worth reading!
by can-amsledder on Mon Jan 19, 2009 8:41 am

The following scenario would be typical for a snowmobiler’s day. It is early morning, the sun is out and you are fuelled up and ready to go. You say to your riding group, " Wow! The Trails Council did another great job last night." The miles fade into the distance behind you and you are just having a blast. After a great ride to your destination, it is time to head back home. As you return home, that trail that was smooth eight hours ago, now looks more like an old time washboard. What the heck happened to the trail we rode on this morning? This question is asked hundreds of times every weekend. The answers are not simple because good trails depend on a number of factors, temperature, amount and kind of snow, and the traffic during the day. Snow can be fluffy like cotton, wet and sloppy, granular like sugar and any one of a hundred variations in between. As we ride over the smooth trails, the packed snow is loosened a bit as each sled passes. Each machine tends to sink in where the snow is soft and the harder portions of the trail become the tops of the growing moguls. Spinning tracks and speeding around corners loosens the snow even faster. After hundreds of sleds have passed over a trail, it becomes mogul city. In addition, temperatures above freezing are deadly to any trail no matter where it is located and how much snow is on it.
After hundreds of riders have torn up the trails, it is the responsibility of the groomer drivers to fix the damage and make it smooth for the next day. Grooming requires that we first fill the tractors with diesel and check the oil and emergency lighting, boy it is going to be a long night. Our drivers prefer to go at night because they need to groom the trails when there are fewer sleds on them. Lower traffic volume means the trail has a better chance to "set up" and is much safer for everyone. We are now rolling down the trail at a speedy 5 to 8 miles per hour. We look out ahead of our front blade and all we can see are moguls! It’s going to be a long trip around the loop tonight! We drop the front blades and drag as low as possible. The drag is that big long thing we pull behind the grooming. We have to get the blades of the drag down to the bottom of the moguls. If we only skim the top of the mogul, then we are wasting our time. If we cut off the top of the mogul, snow held in the drag will be deposited in the low spots between the moguls. The trail will look smooth behind the drag but it is not, after the first couple of sleds pass over it. By running our blades on the front of the drag and the tractor as low as we can, we take the whole mogul out. Now that the front blade of the drag has taken out the mogul, the snow is funnelled through a series of other blades before it reaches the pan. (The pan is located at the very back of the drag.) As the snow goes under the pan, it gets flattened out and packed down.
Groomers call the snow that comes out from under the pan "The Ribbon". Every groomer operator loves a good ribbon. Now comes the most important part of grooming. The ribbon needs time and cold temperatures to "set up". If the temperature is at or above freezing, the ribbon will not set up. If these conditions last, the trail will not hold up the following day to all of the sled traffic. When it is cold out and we have some new snow, the ribbon will set up and will harden up almost like cement. When the weather is cold, the groomer operators are happy because the trails can then take a bigger beating and will last longer. We also use the front blades on the groomer when we have to bring snow back into a corner where the speed demons have thrown it out.
I hope you are still with me and are paying attention because you have learned something about making your trails smooth. I have explained how a mogul starts, what we do to get rid of them and how the ribbon looks and feels. I will now explain how one should treat the ribbon when you meet a groomer. When you are on a narrow trail, you must ride on the ribbon after you meet a groomer. When this happens, don't spin your track right away. Speed won't hurt the ribbon but stopping and starting will. When you meet a groomer on a wide trail you probably say, "Wow fresh trails, but don't jump on the ribbon right away because the snow hasn’t had a chance to set up yet. If it is reasonably smooth on the old section, stay on the old section and let the new ribbon set up. If the trail is rough, by all means get on the smooth part since we don't want you to ride on rough trails. Just be careful how you treat the ribbon at first. All it takes is a couple of sleds ruined the riding on that section of the trail for the following day.
Weather is the major deciding factor in determining the condition of the trails and how long a freshly groomed trail lasts. Cold is good, colder is better and low sled traffic and a cold night insure a good ride the next day. There are times when want a good wet snow. When we receive wet snow and then cold weather follows, our ribbon becomes like cement. The temperatures usually drop in the evening and the lower amount of sled traffic gives the ribbon time to set up. If you are sledding at night, remember don't tear up the ribbon because you are ruining it for everyone the next day.
Now, what to do when you meet a groomer. There are three things you must do. First, get out of the way! The tractor and drag cannot get off the trail easily. A snowmobile can get off the trail much easier and remember a stuck sled is easier to get out than a stuck grooming tractor! Second, use the proper hand signals to let the groomer know how many sleds are behind you. It is nice to know if someone else is coming, especially if we are approaching a corner. Third, give the drivers a big thumbs up and let them know that you appreciate them volunteering hours of their time to help groom the trails. If you come up behind a groomer, wait until he sees you in his rear view mirrors. As soon as we can find a place to get off to the side, we will pull over, stop, and let you pass. A little patience on your part could avoid a nasty accident. Remember we are much bigger than you are!
Lastly, another great way to keep the snowmobile trails smooth is to join a local club. Without snowmobile clubs providing volunteer labor and raising money to help buy grooming equipment, your trail permit fees would need to be at least 10 or 15 times higher than they are today. Join our club or any club for that matter, and participate in some of the events they sponsor throughout the year. Become a part of the 10 percent of snowmobilers who help with the trails. As more people participate, the job of keeping our trails in great condition becomes easier for everyone concerned.can-amsledder

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TRICKPaint said:
As it says below, "worth reading!"

Grooming 101! Long, but worth reading!
by can-amsledder on Mon Jan 19, 2009 8:41 am

The following scenario would be typical for a snowmobiler’s day. It is early morning, the sun is out and you are fuelled up and ready to go. You say to your riding group, " Wow! The Trails Council did another great job last night." The miles fade into the distance behind you and you are just having a blast. After a great ride to your destination, it is time to head back home. As you return home, that trail that was smooth eight hours ago, now looks more like an old time washboard. What the heck happened to the trail we rode on this morning? This question is asked hundreds of times every weekend. The answers are not simple because good trails depend on a number of factors, temperature, amount and kind of snow, and the traffic during the day. Snow can be fluffy like cotton, wet and sloppy, granular like sugar and any one of a hundred variations in between. As we ride over the smooth trails, the packed snow is loosened a bit as each sled passes. Each machine tends to sink in where the snow is soft and the harder portions of the trail become the tops of the growing moguls. Spinning tracks and speeding around corners loosens the snow even faster. After hundreds of sleds have passed over a trail, it becomes mogul city. In addition, temperatures above freezing are deadly to any trail no matter where it is located and how much snow is on it.
After hundreds of riders have torn up the trails, it is the responsibility of the groomer drivers to fix the damage and make it smooth for the next day. Grooming requires that we first fill the tractors with diesel and check the oil and emergency lighting, boy it is going to be a long night. Our drivers prefer to go at night because they need to groom the trails when there are fewer sleds on them. Lower traffic volume means the trail has a better chance to "set up" and is much safer for everyone. We are now rolling down the trail at a speedy 5 to 8 miles per hour. We look out ahead of our front blade and all we can see are moguls! It’s going to be a long trip around the loop tonight! We drop the front blades and drag as low as possible. The drag is that big long thing we pull behind the grooming. We have to get the blades of the drag down to the bottom of the moguls. If we only skim the top of the mogul, then we are wasting our time. If we cut off the top of the mogul, snow held in the drag will be deposited in the low spots between the moguls. The trail will look smooth behind the drag but it is not, after the first couple of sleds pass over it. By running our blades on the front of the drag and the tractor as low as we can, we take the whole mogul out. Now that the front blade of the drag has taken out the mogul, the snow is funnelled through a series of other blades before it reaches the pan. (The pan is located at the very back of the drag.) As the snow goes under the pan, it gets flattened out and packed down.
Groomers call the snow that comes out from under the pan "The Ribbon". Every groomer operator loves a good ribbon. Now comes the most important part of grooming. The ribbon needs time and cold temperatures to "set up". If the temperature is at or above freezing, the ribbon will not set up. If these conditions last, the trail will not hold up the following day to all of the sled traffic. When it is cold out and we have some new snow, the ribbon will set up and will harden up almost like cement. When the weather is cold, the groomer operators are happy because the trails can then take a bigger beating and will last longer. We also use the front blades on the groomer when we have to bring snow back into a corner where the speed demons have thrown it out.
I hope you are still with me and are paying attention because you have learned something about making your trails smooth. I have explained how a mogul starts, what we do to get rid of them and how the ribbon looks and feels. I will now explain how one should treat the ribbon when you meet a groomer. [highlight=red]When you are on a narrow trail, you must ride on the ribbon after you meet a groomer. When this happens, don't spin your track right away. Speed won't hurt the ribbon but stopping and starting will. When you meet a groomer on a wide trail you probably say, "Wow fresh trails, but don't jump on the ribbon right away because the snow hasn’t had a chance to set up yet. [/highlight=red]If it is reasonably smooth on the old section, stay on the old section and let the new ribbon set up. If the trail is rough, by all means get on the smooth part since we don't want you to ride on rough trails. Just be careful how you treat the ribbon at first. All it takes is a couple of sleds ruined the riding on that section of the trail for the following day.
Weather is the major deciding factor in determining the condition of the trails and how long a freshly groomed trail lasts. Cold is good, colder is better and low sled traffic and a cold night insure a good ride the next day. There are times when want a good wet snow. When we receive wet snow and then cold weather follows, our ribbon becomes like cement. The temperatures usually drop in the evening and the lower amount of sled traffic gives the ribbon time to set up. If you are sledding at night, remember don't tear up the ribbon because you are ruining it for everyone the next day.
Now, what to do when you meet a groomer. There are three things you must do. First, get out of the way! The tractor and drag cannot get off the trail easily. A snowmobile can get off the trail much easier and remember a stuck sled is easier to get out than a stuck grooming tractor! Second, use the proper hand signals to let the groomer know how many sleds are behind you. It is nice to know if someone else is coming, especially if we are approaching a corner. Third, give the drivers a big thumbs up and let them know that you appreciate them volunteering hours of their time to help groom the trails. If you come up behind a groomer, wait until he sees you in his rear view mirrors. As soon as we can find a place to get off to the side, we will pull over, stop, and let you pass. A little patience on your part could avoid a nasty accident. Remember we are much bigger than you are!
Lastly, another great way to keep the snowmobile trails smooth is to join a local club. Without snowmobile clubs providing volunteer labor and raising money to help buy grooming equipment, your trail permit fees would need to be at least 10 or 15 times higher than they are today. Join our club or any club for that matter, and participate in some of the events they sponsor throughout the year. Become a part of the 10 percent of snowmobilers who help with the trails. As more people participate, the job of keeping our trails in great condition becomes easier for everyone concerned.can-amsledder

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Wow that is one detailed article. Nice find Trick. You dont how many times ive encounterd what ive highlighted in red.
 

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sno700 said:
The drag was built by a local fabricator from here. I beleive they either got some blue prints or took some demonsions off of another drag. It does do an ok job but its been with the club for about 10 years and its just getting time to upgrade. Right now its at the same shop where it was built to fix some cracks in the frame. Arrowhead makes some really nice drags( www.charlesvogelent.com )



Found this while looking at drags...guess you could qualify this as having a bad day.


201031614411107_21987.jpg
Vogels are nice but you better have a welder handy. They break alot. Sno Boss is more durable.

We have been the arrowhead drag route. Never again.

Talk to Doug At Sno Boss. Good guy to deal with.
 
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