Snowmobile Fanatics banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
474 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I am going to visit my brother this weekend in the Traverse City area and I was thinking of dragging the sleds along. Are the trails in pretty good condition?

He also said it is legal to ride the roads up there... is this true? How bad are the cops on the roads/trails for stuff? Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
Traverse City Trail Report:
DATE: 12/13/2010
BASE: 6+
PAST 24 Hrs: 10"
CONDITION: great
With awesome snow over the weekend we are in good shape going foward. The winds have been pretty severe in the 40+mph range, should die down by Wednedsday. Looking foward we have snow in the forecast eveyday, albeit 1-3". So get you room booked at the Ranch and grab your cold weather gear and head up North.PLEASE subscribe to our trail report, direct to you inbox as we update.www.snowblitz.com PLEASE do not call for trail conditions. Emails are OK if we have not updated in a few days. Thanks, we appreciate your support coming into another great sledding season.. Cheers Brett
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
474 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. How about riding on the roads. I'm still wondering about that... I don't fully understand how to interpret the law:

* A snowmobile may be operated on the right-of-way of a public highway (except a limited-access highway) if it is operated at the extreme right of the open portion of the right-of-way and with the flow of traffic on the highway. Snowmobiles operated on a road right-of-way must travel in single file and shall not be operated abreast except when overtaking or passing another snowmobile.

* A snowmobile may be operated on the roadway or shoulder when necessary to cross a bridge or culvert if the snowmobile is brought to a complete stop before entering onto the roadway or shoulder and the operator yields the right-of-way to any approaching motor vehicle on the highway.

* A snowmobile may be operated across a public highway, other than a limited access highway, at right angles to the highway for the purpose of getting from one area to another when the operation can be done safely and another vehicle is not crossing the highway at the same time in the immediate area. An operator must bring his/her snowmobile to a complete stop before proceeding across the public highway and must yield the right-of-way to all oncoming traffic.

* Snowmobiles may be operated on a highway in a county road system, which is not normally snowplowed for vehicular traffic; and on the right-of-way or shoulder when no right-of-way exists on a snowplowed highway in a county road system, outside the corporate limits of a city or village, which is designated and marked for snowmobile use by the county road commission having jurisdiction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
MaxTrax said:
Thanks. How about riding on the roads. I'm still wondering about that... I don't fully understand how to interpret the law:

* A snowmobile may be operated on the right-of-way of a public highway (except a limited-access highway) if it is operated at the extreme right of the open portion of the right-of-way and with the flow of traffic on the highway. Snowmobiles operated on a road right-of-way must travel in single file and shall not be operated abreast except when overtaking or passing another snowmobile.

* A snowmobile may be operated on the roadway or shoulder when necessary to cross a bridge or culvert if the snowmobile is brought to a complete stop before entering onto the roadway or shoulder and the operator yields the right-of-way to any approaching motor vehicle on the highway.

* A snowmobile may be operated across a public highway, other than a limited access highway, at right angles to the highway for the purpose of getting from one area to another when the operation can be done safely and another vehicle is not crossing the highway at the same time in the immediate area. An operator must bring his/her snowmobile to a complete stop before proceeding across the public highway and must yield the right-of-way to all oncoming traffic.

* Snowmobiles may be operated on a highway in a county road system, which is not normally snowplowed for vehicular traffic; and on the right-of-way or shoulder when no right-of-way exists on a snowplowed highway in a county road system, outside the corporate limits of a city or village, which is designated and marked for snowmobile use by the county road commission having jurisdiction.
It is totally legal... That is just a bunch of legal BS to say, if you are going to ride on the roads, you must be all the way to the right and travel in single file lines. I have never been pulled over or cited or anything for riding on the roads. I can't speak for the Traverse City PD, but they are used to a lot of sled traffic, and used to sharing the road with snowmobiles. You are good to go... I wouldn't go ripping through a downtown area at 50 +, then your just asking for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
821 Posts
Your going to find you won't have a need to ride the roads much even if it is legal. I road in Traverse City a few years ago and really liked the trails there. I would stick to the trails and if you like off trail there are some neat areas for that also that we found.
 
Joined
·
1,792 Posts
MaxTrax said:
Thanks. How about riding on the roads. I'm still wondering about that... I don't fully understand how to interpret the law:

* A snowmobile may be operated on the right-of-way of a public highway (except a limited-access highway) if it is operated at the extreme right of the open portion of the right-of-way and with the flow of traffic on the highway. Snowmobiles operated on a road right-of-way must travel in single file and shall not be operated abreast except when overtaking or passing another snowmobile.
You have to ride as far right as you can on the road. No double side by side riding like motorcycle riders do in the summer.


MaxTrax said:
* A snowmobile may be operated on the roadway or shoulder when necessary to cross a bridge or culvert if the snowmobile is brought to a complete stop before entering onto the roadway or shoulder and the operator yields the right-of-way to any approaching motor vehicle on the highway.

* A snowmobile may be operated across a public highway, other than a limited access highway, at right angles to the highway for the purpose of getting from one area to another when the operation can be done safely and another vehicle is not crossing the highway at the same time in the immediate area. An operator must bring his/her snowmobile to a complete stop before proceeding across the public highway and must yield the right-of-way to all oncoming traffic.

* Snowmobiles may be operated on a highway in a county road system, which is not normally snowplowed for vehicular traffic; and on the right-of-way or shoulder when no right-of-way exists on a snowplowed highway in a county road system, outside the corporate limits of a city or village, which is designated and marked for snowmobile use by the county road commission having jurisdiction.

You can't ride down I-75 at ANYTIME, even if it's unplowed and vehicles can't traverse it.
Non highway roads you can. Think of it this way - how would you ride on the road if you are a bicyclist? That's essentially the same for snowmobiles.
And if you exceed the posted speed limit for the road, that can get you a ticket.

"snowplowed highway in a county road system" - IE. M-31 (outside city limits that may prohibit snowmobiles)
"limited-access highway" - IE. I-75
"right angles to the highway " - you may cross a road to get to the other side, provided it's not I-75 you are trying to cross.

Crossing a road like this without regard to vehicle traffic is not legal:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j85YBzr3sj0

neither is this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4PEdj54hxDg&feature=related
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
474 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Haha... Thats great! I just saw those last night. I will definitely not be doing that. Because the law sounds like you can ride on any roadways (on the first section) but then when you read the last section it sounds like you can only ride if its posted as being a snowmobile trail.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
I've been to Traverse City a couple times on the bike...awesome country up that way!

Might try to get up there on the sleds this winter..

Burch
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top