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I've got a 95 XLT SP, which I've been running NGK BR9EIX in for over two years since I got the sled. The previous owner (buddy) also ran BR9's, however the NGK website lists BR8's as been the designated plug for an XLT up to 96, in 97 they list the BR9's. I've seen tons of XLT owners on this forum, what everyone else using? At 12$ a plug (for the iridiums) should I try the BR8's in the machine?
 

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If it doesn't foul often, stick with the 9's. The 8's run hotter and therefore can bring you closer to a lean meltdown.

You don't have to believe everything you think!
 

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Don't worry about running the 8's. I had a 1995 XLT Special and ran more than 16,000 miles without a hint of problems. Heck, I took the top end off, looked at the cylinder walls, bought a new gasket, and put everything back together.

Never had ANY problems in ALL those miles with 9's. Come to think of it, I never had any problems in all those miles with anything except wear items. Went through a few belts, hyfax, and many, MANY sets of wearbars and carbides.

GREAT sled. One of the most reliable sleds I've ever had. I kinda miss it, although I'm hoping the upgrade to a 2000 700 XC SP 45th Anniversary Edition is a good choice. Haven't gotten to ride it yet...
 

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I ran BR9ES plugs in my 93 XLT special. I also had it piped. It ran great for the 4 years I owned it. My question to you is, 'why are you spending $12.00 per plug ($36.00 total) for the iridiums, when the basic ES style plugs do the same thing'? You are gaining no performance what so ever with them. Your just wasting alot of money on plugs that you dont need.

'HAMMER DOWN !!'
 

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If you don't foul with the 9's then stick with them. I run 9's but I keep some 8's as spares in case it feels like fouling. As far as the iridiums, I wouldn't use them unless you have to. I have had engines that wouldn't run on standard plugs, but they weren't on a snowmobile. But regardless of what anyone else runs in their sled every sled is different. On top of that any modifications, temperature and alltitude all affect air fuel ratio. So bottom line is run the coldest plug you can get away with.
 

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I run 9's but carry some 8's to burn off excess oil if the temperature goes over 36 degrees F. That way I am not messing with jetting all the time.
 
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