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I'm new to snowmobiling but I've been around cars and motorcycles all my life. Yesterday I picked up a 77 Polaris TX twin cylinder. I cleaned out all the old fuel, changed the fuel lines, throttle cable and spark plugs and managed to get the engine running, though not perfectly. The track spins ok in the air, and on garage floor with no on the sled, but when I took it outside and tried to go, it just seemed to rev. I figure if it was a traction problem, it should at least be throwing snow out behind it, but it doesn't seem to. With some pushing I managed to get it going down the road but as soon as I slowed down and tried to turn around, I got caught up in the edge of the snowbank and lost my drive again. Then it stalled and would not start again. We brought it back on the truck and managed to get it started again but still had no drive. I think I can sort out the carb problems but I don't know where to start with the drive system. The track looks to be in good shape. Can somebody please help? [/font=Comic Sans MS]
 

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Does the engine rev high when it won't move or does it bogg down? If it revs high some thing like the drive belt might be worn too much. Or check chain tension, or it might be possible that one of the clutches are loose, or a stripped out spline.

 

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Welcome problematic. It sounds like one of the clutches are seized or binding. Start by removing the belt. next start the machine and rev up slowly . Watch the clutch. at about 4000 rpm the outer half of the clutch on the motor is supposed to smoothly move in. Rev it slightly more and make sure that the two halves can come completely together. dont over rev. If this all works fine. your drive clutch at least is not seized. Next get a new belt that you know is the right one for the sled or check yours against a new one.Next check the secondary clutch by making sure you can push the back half of the sheave towards the airbox and that You can rotate the back half clockwise about a 1/4 turn against spring pressure.Usually about 14lbs of rotational pull. dont let it snap back, but make sure it could if you were to let go. try these for now and let us know.
 
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